Prime Day camera alert The Fujifilm XT100 drops to its lowest ever

first_imgAmazon Prime Day Deals If you’re looking for stylish, intuitive mirrorless camera to take your photography to the next level, they don’t come much better than the Fujifilm X-T100 – and it’s now dropped to its lowest ever price in this superb Amazon Prime Day 2019 deal.With a 22% Prime Day discount available on 15-16 July, you can now pick one up for just £429 – and incredibly, that’s with an XC15-45mm kit lens too. Price drop – Fujifilm X-T100Fujifilm X-T100 with XC15-45mm lensThe perfect ‘learner’ camera for beginners looking to step up from smartphone photography, the X-T100 was already great value – but is now one of the best camera buys around with this huge discount. It has a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor, an electronic viewfinder and is compatible with arguably the best range of lenses around.Amazon|Save £190|Now £429View DealNow £429|Save £190|Amazon Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Related: Best Camera Deals for Amazon Prime Day 2019In our review of the Fujifilm X-T100, we said: “The X-T100 would make a great first ‘proper’ camera for anyone whose Instagram habit has turned into an addiction (assuming it’s the taking photos part you like, rather than the showing off bit).”We concluded: “The combination of retro styling and premium build in a compact body makes it a lovely object to own and use, and you’d have to spend a lot more to better the photos it takes.”Want to stay up to date with Amazon Prime Day 2019? We’ve got you covered. For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. ——————————————————————————————————–Grab these great Prime Day savingsSave £40 on the Kindle Paperwhite£160 off the Dell Inspiron 14 Chromebook Why is the X-T100 such a good camera for learning about photography and trumping your smartphone snaps? Well, like more premium cameras like the Fujifilm X-T30, it has an electronic viewfinder, intuitive manual dials, and a stylish, retro design – but it’s also priced like a premium compact camera.You’ll be able to produce results that go well beyond a compact camera, though, because the X-T100 is compatible with X-Series lenses, which arguably have the best collection of affordable prime lenses on any camera system.The Fujifilm X-T100, with an XC15-45mm kit lens, has never before been below £500, let alone the £429 it’s available for during Prime Day.The X-T100’s 24.2MP APS-C sensor is very sharp and digs out incredible detail, and it’s a very capable vlogging camera too thanks to the side-flipping screen – a feature that you don’t get even on the far more pricey Fujifilm X-T30.The cherry on top, particularly for those who don’t like to spend hours editing photos, are Fujifilm’s excellent Film Simulations – flip it into Vivid for punchier colours that don’t go overboard, or Classic Chrome for a moodier look. Price drop – Fujifilm X-T100Fujifilm X-T100 with XC15-45mm lensThe perfect ‘learner’ camera for beginners looking to step up from smartphone photography, the X-T100 was already great value – but is now one of the best camera buys around with this huge discount. It has a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor, an electronic viewfinder and is compatible with arguably the best range of lenses around.Amazon|Save £190|Now £429View DealNow £429|Save £190|Amazon We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

Final Fantasy 16 What wed love to see from the next instalment

first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think. Despite a long and arduous development cycle, Final Fantasy 15 has proven to be a global hit since launching in November 2016. The latest and greatest JRPG from Square Enix has received several DLC expansions, modes and even a popular mobile game. And that’s not all, with the Royal Edition coming to PS4, Xbox One and PC in just a couple weeks time.Although Final Fantasy 15’s popularity shows no signs of slowing, we can’t help but think about what Final Fantasy 16 could bring to the table. On that note, Trusted Reviews compiled everything we know and would love to see from the mysterious RPG. Related: Best RPG GamesWhat is Final Fantasy 16?Square Enix is yet to confirm the existence of Final Fantasy 16, including whether or not the project has entered any form of production at the studio. As with all titles in the series, it will likely introduce a brand new world filled with compelling characters and locations that players will be eager to explore. Final Fantasy 16 release date – when is it coming out?A release date for Final Fantasy 16 is, to be blunt, an absolute pipedream at this stage. E3 2019 is coming up, so perhaps we’ll finally see a reveal in June? Final Fantasy 16 wishlist – what we’d love to seeA greater variety of charactersFinal Fantasy 15’s quartet of charismatic boys proved hugely entertaining, carrying us through a sprawling adventure with their likeable personalities. Unfortunately, beyond the core cast, characters were incredibly lacking, especially compared to earlier games in the series. We’d like to see Final Fantasy 16 massively expand upon its main cast of heroes, and perhaps ensure its repertoire of non-male characters expand beyond helpless sidekicks and obvious sex appeal. Past games in the series, such as VII, IX and XII have proven that an ensemble cast can be brilliantly entertaining when executed well. A bigger, more ambitious settingThe world of Final Fantasy 15 felt like it was cut apart during development, providing us with only a single sprawling play area before funneling the player into a series of linear missions ahead of the endgame. It was jarring, failing to tell a fully cohesive story or depict a world that truly felt alive. We want to see this improved in 16. Players digging into the code of Final Fantasy 15 discovered areas never meant to be explored in the finished product, which could have remained incomplete due to time constraints at Square Enix. If Final Fantasy 16 manages to fulfill this sort of ambitious vision, it could be one of the best in the series for years. A tech demo from 2012 depicts a middle-eastern setting mixed with a fantastical array of magical elements, it’s a world we wouldn’t mind exploring in FF16:Related: Cyberpunk 2077Refined combat systemFinal Fantasy has been transitioning from its turn-based roots for years now, opting for a real-time battle system that favours fast, dynamic combat over the archaic sequence of menus and time gauges. While we still have a soft spot for the older ways, it’s unlikely we’ll see a return to that formula anytime soon. Chances are we’ll see Square Enix pursue the combat system first introduced with Final Fantasy 15 alongside further refinements and mechanical introductions. While fun, combat was relatively scrappy and lacking in a meaningful sense of depth. Much of the entertainment came from the party’s frequent banter and the sheer scale of some enemies. We’d love to see this existing method of combat improved with more skills, characters, and methods of customisation that will provide an incentive to grind sidequests away from the main narrative. The dodgy camera could certainly be tweaked as well since we got a little tired of finding ourselves inside trees and bushes throughout Final Fantasy 15.Related: Indivisible PreviewMore enemy types Final Fantasy 15 had all the hallmarks we’ve come to expect from the series. Chocobos, Cactuars, Marlboros and more were present and accounted for. Unfortunately, many of the adversaries your party faced were little more than generic robot soldiers who felt like useless cannon fodder. Many of the standout fights were found in hunts, which required players to abandon the main story in favour of side quests that, unfortunately, offered hardly anything in terms of worthwhile rewards. We’d love to see Final Fantasy 15 expands its horizons in terms of both enemy and environmental design, offering something we really haven’t seen before. What’s on your wishlist for Final Fantasy 16? Let us know on Facebook and Twitter. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.last_img read more

BREAKING SEC Lists Tesla CEO Elon Musk As Defendant In Lawsuit

The Securities and Exchange Commision has formally listed Tesla CEO Elon Musk as a defendant in a lawsuit.The Securities and Exchange Commission filed the lawsuit on Thursday over what appears to be alleged securities fraud, likely tied to Musk’s “taking Tesla private” claim and/or secured funding claims. Neither the SEC nor Tesla/Musk can comment on this due to it now being an open, official lawsuit.We’ve embedded the entire document on this developing story directly below:.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 27, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

GM Shuffles EV Leaders Ahead Of Electrification Push

The third change is the move of Michael Ableson from GM’s Vice President of Global Strategy to a new position of Vice President of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (under Fletcher).“Ableson will lead GM’s efforts in developing necessary partnerships or identifying incentives and investments that could lead to a more fleshed-out EV charging infrastructure. This effort is designed to “remove a critical barrier to acceptance of electrification,” Parks said.”Source: The Detroit News GM is preparing a team of leaders for the age of electrification.According to the latest news, General Motors made significant changes in top executive positions related to electric cars and autonomous driving. By 2023, the company intends to introduce 20 plug-ins.Pamela Fletcher, former GM Vice President of Global Electric Vehicle Programs, from October 1 took on a new role of Vice President of Innovation (directly under CEO Mary Barra).Fletcher’s duties will be taken over by Fletcher’s boss Doug Parks, Vice President of Autonomous and Electric Vehicle Programs.““Pam’s new role leverages her engineering and entrepreneurial background to focus on identifying, integrating and accelerating new growth opportunities that will directly benefit our customers,” Parks said in a statement.” Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 7, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Watch This Chevy Volt Drive Itself With Openpilot From Comma.ai GM’s Global Transmission Electrification Head Discusses EV Future Source: Electric Vehicle News Chevy Volt Quarterly And Monthly Sales Way Up, Chevy Bolt Rising GM news read more

Mobile EV chargers deliver power where its needed

first_imgFor charging network operators and would-be site hosts, determining the best new locations to satisfy the expanding fleet of EVs has been challenging, due to the need to know where the vehicles reside and where they are most frequently driven. However, the necessary data to answer these questions is not freely available, which makes the ability to relocate charging stations if stations become underutilized an attractive option. In addition to working with automakers and ridesharing fleets, FreeWire is partnering with utilities such as the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), which is leasing out the FreeWire chargers to fleet customers. “Utilities are looking at (mobile charging) as a non-wires solution,” said Sosinov. He added that multi-unit dwellings can also benefit from mobile charging, because of the challenges of getting access to parking spots near power and the difficulties of negotiating with homeowners’ associations that don’t want to give preferential treatment to specific tenants. FreeWire has received funding from BP Ventures and the Volvo Tech Fund. Event organizers at remote locations that need to accommodate EVs on a short-term basis require portable solutions that can be brought in on trucks and taken away the same day. One company addressing this need is EV Safe Charge, which is based in Los Angeles. The company’s EV Charge Mobile stations can deliver up to 50 kW of DC power, and are not grid-connected. CEO and founder Caradoc Ehrenhalt says the company is using diesel generators to provide the electricity, because “battery-based solutions discharge too fast” and have insufficient capacity for the volumes of energy needed by EV Safe Charge’s customers. To make the use of its products more sustainable, Ehrenhalt claims that EV Safe Charge offsets the greenhouse gas emissions by planting trees. EV Safe Charge rents equipment for short-term events including festivals, sporting events and EV launch events that last only a few days. The company first put its technology in the field when it provided charging stations to Jaguar, which needed power to support ride-and-drive events to promote the launch of its I-PACE electric SUV. Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine A few companies have introduced mobile charging products to solve unique challenges.The perceived lack of ready access to charging stations is one factor that has limited consumers’ interest in buying electric vehicles. While the number and diversity of locations of EV charging stations are growing, thanks to networks such as Electrify America, chargers can be hard to find in urban centers, or on the outskirts of cities. The most suitable locations to meet drivers’ charging needs can sometimes be too expensive to operate due to installation and energy costs, or too far from available power to be tenable. Both established and startup companies are addressing this conundrum by developing variations on mobile charging solutions to address specific needs. There’s a spate of new products aimed at making EV charging more flexible by simplifying installation and bringing chargers closer to the vehicles. Taking a more simplistic and localized approach is Berlin-based Chargery, which focuses on vehicles dispersed in cities where the available charging is insufficient or too inconvenient. The startup uses bicycles to tow a small trailer containing a 24 kWh battery to deliver charging to vehicles parked in urban areas. Power delivery is limited to 3.7 kW, and the company claims to be using 100% renewable energy to charge the batteries. Chargery lists as clients BMW, Daimler and Skoda, and has received investment from mobility services company Sixt. Predating these efforts to make charging easier to deploy and free from grid connections are solar EV chargers, which debuted nearly a decade ago. Envision Solar, of San Diego, produces charging equipment that combines solar power with battery storage to enable vehicles to be plugged in without the need for a grid connection. These portable stations, such as Envision’s EV ARC, can provide power temporarily or permanently at a lower cost in locations that are far from power, by alleviating the need for costly trenching or capacity upgrades. When EV charging stations were first rolled out, many thought of them as destinations for refueling that would be worth the trip. However, EV owners want to charge wherever they normally go, which is often in crowded areas where parking is challenging, or far away from power sources. It may be that not all of the above approaches to mobile charging will establish a successful niche, but they are making valuable progress towards the goal of bringing convenience to the expanding EV audience.This article appeared in Charged Issue 43 – May/June 2019 – Subscribe now. Los Angeles-based charging infrastructure developer EVgo has been at the forefront of DC fast charging since its inception in 2010. In September 2018, the company unveiled its EVgo FastStart modular units, which can include a combination of Level 2 and DC fast charging connections.Installing charging stations, especially those featuring higher power levels, can take months to a year or more, due to permitting requirements and any capacity upgrades that must be negotiated with the utility. According to Ivo Steklac, CTO at EVgo, FastStart units are prefabricated and can cut the time for installation down to just a few days, as they are attached to a pad that alleviates the need to pour a concrete foundation. The portability of the units is beneficial to customers who may have shorter-term leases at the locations, and where additional value can be received by moving the chargers to another location, according to Steklac. FreeWire Technologies is focusing on the portability of EV chargers with its Mobi EV Charger products, which sit atop wheels for easy relocation. The company, which is based in San Leandro, California, currently has chargers delivering power to 300 Volkswagen EVs in London, in partnership with the local utility Centrica and shared fleet operator Zipcar. FreeWire’s mobile DC chargers can deliver up to 120 kW of power, and the company also offers Level 2 charging. According to Arcady Sosinov, CEO of FreeWire, if more than 20 vehicles per day need to be charged, FreeWire’s service is less costly than a stationary solution, even when factoring in the additional labor cost of moving the chargers. The Mobi EV Charger features battery storage, so it draws power at a rate of 20 kW or less, which allows station operators to avoid incurring utility demand charges, which can add thousands of dollars per month in energy costs. last_img read more

Talking horses

first_imgHorse racing Horse racing Reuse this content,View all comments > The best bets from around the country, plus the latest news in our daily racing blog Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Close report comment form Sportblog Share on Facebook Share via Email Horse racing tips Talking horses Ron Cox Comments 0 Share on Pinterest Shares00 collapsed Topics First published on Sat 11 Oct 2008 06.23 EDT blogposts 100 … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Show 25 Email (optional) Support The Guardian recommendations Share via Email Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Since you’re here… Sat 11 Oct 2008 06.23 EDT 25 Sportblog Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp newest The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Read more Get the holiday money backing 20-1 shot CreteWith 67 winners, William Haggas is enjoying one of his best seasons and for followers of the Newmarket trainer it has been a rewarding time. The stable is showing a level stakes profit of over 60 points on all runners, and at Ascot today the 20-1 shot Crete can give Haggas another notable success.The six-year-old’s target is the £75,000 ladbrokes.com Stakes, in which Crete (2.20) will be in a visor for the first time. This could be the key to an improved showing from Crete, who often comes with a powerful challenge but is worried out of things, as was the case when he finished second to Fiulin at Yarmouth.”The visor has certainly sharpened him up at home. We know he has the ability to run a big race,” said Harry Herbert, racing manager for Crete’s owners Highclere Racing, yesterday.Young Mick is favourite with the sponsors after enduring a near-miss over the Ascot course and distance when second to Night Crescendo. Unfortunately, the top-weight is up another 3lb in the ratings and he looks to be in the handicapper’s grip.Ascot 1.10 Ascot’s straight course dries out pretty rapidly, which is good news for connections of the speedy Amour Propre. He has to overcome a lengthy absence, however, and last month’s Ayr winner Magic Cat is preferred. That form was boosted when runner-up Total Gallery went on to win a valuable sales race.Chepstow 1.25 At his best on good ground and when fresh, Bowleaze can repeat last year’s victory in this race. expanded View more comments Threads collapsed Share on Facebook Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other unthreaded Loading comments… Trouble loading? 50 Reason (optional) Ascot 1.45 Sir Gerry had six of today’s rivals behind when third to King’s Apostle here last time, but that was a muddling race and the form is not sure to stand up. It can pay to give another chance to Intrepid Jack, who was not beaten far in eighth place on watered ground which did not suit him according to trainer Hughie Morrison. Musselburgh 2.10 From her low draw, Princess Ellis can burn off this opposition. She is 18lb higher than when scoring here in June, but turned in a much-improved display when behind Peace Offering at Newmarket last week.Bangor 2.25 Well-treated on his Ascot defeat of Yardbird last season, Cruising River is the interesting one here. He has his first run for new trainer Jamie Snowden, who looks likely to make the grade.Musselburgh 2.40 Unlucky on his penultimate start, Merchant Of Dubai returned to winning ways with victory at Southwell. A 5lb rise may not be enough to stop him.Bangor 2.55 John Quinn has won this race for the past two years and Holiday Cocktail can give the Yorkshire trainer a hat-trick. Still relatively unexposed over hurdles, the six-year-old has been in good form this Flat season with four wins.Musselburgh 3.15 Siren’s Gift should soon be winning, but her high draw is not ideal. Cute Ass, who ran second in the Cornwallis Stakes at Ascot this day a year ago, has slipped to a handy mark and last time out hinted at a return to form.Ascot 3.30 Marcus Tregoning won this race with the subsequently top-class Nayef, and there is every chance Taameer will go on to better things judging by the manner of his Newbury debut win.Musselburgh 3.45 Nanton ran a career-best race in the Cambridgeshire, but faces a stiff task against the Godolphin-trained With Interest at level weights.Ascot 4.05 This trip on easy ground should be perfect for Ascot Lime, who appeared to find 11 furlongs stretching his stamina last time at Kempton.Ron Cox’s tip of the daySquadron 2.00 ChepstowAlan King’s gelding failed to fire when 14th to Crack Away Jack in the Fred Winter Handicap Hurdle at Cheltenham, but he can make the most of the 19lb he receives from the top-weight here. He had run second to Crack Away Jack, who was getting 10lb, at Sandown and signed off with a win at Cheltenham which suggests Squadron is nicely treated on this comeback run.Horse senseCandy sweet on AmourHenry Candy will be hoping the ground continues to dry out at Ascot, enabling the trainer’s speedy two-year-old Amour Propre (1.10) to show his true colours in this afternoon’s Cornwallis Stakes. The colt is a top sprinter in the making, based on his home work with classy older stable-mate Corrybrough.By contrast give in the ground will be ideal for Tastahil (2.20), and the Barry Hills team will also be looking for a big effort from Prime Defender (1.45). Four Winds (3.30), who worked well in midweek, can prove the pick of a strong Newmarket challenge in the Autumn Stakes, although we are advised not to underestimate Sans Frontieres. Michael Jarvis has Kite Wood in shape for this Group Three event and, on the evidence of a recent work-out with this Doncaster winner, the unraced Putra One will be one to note when he makes his debut.Ascot Lime (4.05) has not always looked the most genuine of characters, but he is going the right way now and Sir Michael Stoute’s colt looks well handicapped. The lightly raced Lochstar (4.40) should go well for Andrew Balding, who can complete a sprint handicap double with Siren’s Gift (3.15) at Musselburgh.Jump racing moves up a gear at Chepstow, where Shavansky (2.00), with the benefit of a recent spin on the Flat, gets a confident vote from the in-form Charlie Mann team. Carrick Oscar (3.05), having his first run for the yard, is reported to be in top order, while Paul Nicholls’ Tataniano (4.50), comes highly recommended.Breedsbreeze (4.00), who has always looked a chaser in the making, can get off the mark over fences at Bangor, where the pick of the Mann runners may be Fair Point (3.25). Brian Ellison’s Aureate (2.55) gets into the handicap hurdle here on a handy looking mark.Seen and heardStand by for a relaunch of the Racing Post’s highly informative website. New features are likely to be brought in to complement the recent Trackside Live, with its bulletins from course reporters.Jockey Noel Fehily will have completed a marathon session long before tomorrow’s gruelling Velka Pardubicka steeplechase. In action at Southwell on Thursday, Fehily flew out that night to school Nadover at the Czech Republic course yesterday, flew back to ride at Bangor today and tonight takes a flight from Bristol to partner Nadover.Freddie Head, fresh from a successful Flat season, was at Newmarket sales this week and on Thursday took his family along to the National Horseracing Museum, reportedly keen to view the Lester Piggott exhibition.Readers of A Bloody Good Winner, the autobiography of professional punter Dave Nevison, will be interested in the follow-up out next month. A Gambler’s Diary is a “no-holds barred account of life on the road”, from the Cheltenham Festival through to the St Leger fixture.Racecourse commentators have their differing styles, some much louder than others. We leave readers to guess who has been coined “the mound of sound” by his colleagues. Order by oldest oldest Report commentsSign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Alllast_img read more

European Car Manufacturers Heading into a Crisis

first_imgThe Global Warming conspiracy is going to seriously harm the European economy. The political intolerance for the combustion engine has German engine suppliers in a crisis. It appears that there is certainly no more money being invested in any technology to do with the combustion engine. That also means that the unemployment in that industry will rise to the worst levels witnessed during the Great Depression. Normally, you have a transition from one technology to another which always leaves people behind who cannot adapt. However, this particular transition is not being carried out by the free market or the natural trend of evolution in technology. This time, the transition is being compelled by government and the end result is not likely to be very beneficial to the European economy.Additionally, German car manufacturers will have no choice but to move production of combustion engines offshore for other markets. The prospect of being able to manufacture combustion engine cars in Europe for export will diminish greatly. Back in 2010, Ferrari S.p.A. was looking to idle production and eliminate 9% of its work force after sister brand Maserati reduced orders for engines.  While Maserati sells an average of 3,000-3,500 vehicles annually in North America, all Maseratis are built in Italy.Beyond 2021, the EU is finalizing plans that, once agreed later this year, would cut automaker CO2 targets by 15 percent from the 2021 averages by 2025 onward and to 37.5 percent after 2030 That means the average CO2 emissions of less than 60g/km on an NEDC basis (almost 110 miles per gallon), or 66g/km under WLTP. The costs of adding the required tech will not be cost-effective in smaller cars. That means prices on the preferred smaller smart cars in Europe could rise by an additional 10% due to regulation. Categories: Climate, Technology Over 37,000 Head of Cattle Die from Global Warming in Montana? »center_img « Swedish Scientist Debunks Rising Sea Levels last_img read more

Design For Aging NonExistent Elder Fashion

first_imgby, Ronni Bennett, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 Shareselderfashion2[Editorial Note: This post was originally published by Ronni Bennett five years ago and re-posted in response to an inquiry from a fashion designer interested in specializing in fashion for elder women. ChangingAging is cross-posting it as part of our series Design on Aging: Why Everything Sucks.]One big change in women’s clothing since 2008, is the disappearance of sleeves and I directly blame First Lady Michelle Obama. As soon as the media swooned over her toned, upper arms, clothing designers ditched sleeves.So much so, I’m surprised they have left sleeves on winter coats.Watch any television news program, especially on basic cable, and every one of the women anchors, pundits and reporters – you know, the ones who all have matching hairstyles – also show up sleeveless in every appearance. Summer or winter. Day or night.There aren’t many elder women who want to expose upper arms that tend to sag by age 50 or 60 but designers don’t care about us and we have no choice. There are no other clothes.‘Tis the season now for bargains in summer clothes – a good time to buy for next year – but as I peruse the catalogues that pour in, I see more transparent blouses and even pants than much of anything that actually covers a human body.The euphemism for transparent, by the way, is “gauze.” Perhaps there are so many left over because even younger women don’t want to be seen in public looking naked.With few exceptions, even with such retailers as Coldwater Creek that supposedly cater to heftier bodies, there are fewer elastic waists on pants than in the past.When I wrote this post in 2008, I said: “In my case, that means when a pair fits my hips, the waist can’t be closed since mine – and that of many other elder women – long ago expanded to equal the size of my hips.”Now that I’ve lost a good deal of weight, the problem is reversed. Although my waist will never be as svelte as when I was 25, it’s small enough that if the waistband fits comfortably, there is enough extra fabric through the hips for another pair of pants.I think, perhaps, there needs to be another sizing mechanism to go with petite, misses and tall that we have for length. Something that measures hip-to-waist ratio.In blouses and tops, they are enamored of so-called boat necks that lie about two inches below the back of one’s neck. There aren’t many women who don’t get a bit beefy in that area as we get older and it’s not something I want to show off.And aside from turtlenecks, a large number of sweater styles meant for cold weather are designed with boat and v-necks. Do all designers live in warm climates and not realize we want something cozy around our necks?Lately, I’ve been buying winter sweaters in the men’s department. The necks are located in the same place as human necks, they hang much more nicely than women’s sweaters and aren’t made with thin, clingy knits.It is nearly impossible to find a suit that fits an older body. Designers just add fabric for larger sizes without considering differing proportions so that if a jacket fits at the shoulders, it is unlikely to button at the waist. A larger size results in shoulder seams halfway down one’s upper arms while the matching pants or skirt are then baggy.Lack of thought in design applies to shirts too. Even with the recent weight loss, I like what are called “big shirts” to wear with pants, but those, too, are missing proportion in petite sizes (I’m just under 5’ 2”).They are so long, I look like an eight-year-old wearing daddy’s shirt. The problem is easy to see (and should be to correct): clothes are originally proportioned for 5’ 8” and above models, and in sizing down for petites, short legs and short waists are ignored.Another thing: why do the few dresses designed without waists all look like muu-muus of the 1950s – totally shapeless? There are numerous ways to cut and sew fabrics to give some style to dresses without waists, but no attempt is made to do this.And don’t go telling me to shop in big-size stores or whatever the polite phrase is for fat-girl shops. Those clothes, too, are designed for younger bodies that although they are larger than clothes for skinny girls, are created for young, not old, proportions.Our bodies begin to thicken about the time we start menopause (our forties for most of us) and although there were more than 52 million women in the U.S. 45 and older in the 2000 census (37 percent of the female population), and millions more now, we are the forgotten women in the rag trade.One of the ways old people are maligned are with accusations that we lack a sense of style. Don’t blame us. It’s the fashion industry which has not given one second’s thought to how our body shape differs from that of a 17-year-old.This post was originally published at TimeGoesBy.netRelated PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Ageism Design fashion Innovation TimeGoesBylast_img read more

First Fest Music Reimagined Nuts and Bolts

first_imgby, Nate Silas Richardson, ChangingAging ContributorTweet3Share19ShareEmail22 SharesNate Silas Richardson at Rep Studios Nate Silas Richardson at Rep StudiosSo we’ve been cranking away here at REP Studio in Ithaca for the last few weeks, whittling down the original list of 50 pieces from 1914 to a set of 15 songs we will re-imagine and perform on New Year’s Eve for First Fest.To explore the world of music from 100 years ago I turned to the Library of Congress’ amazing National Jukebox, which makes historical recordings available to the public free of charge. Then we dug in and played with the tunes, experimenting with various approaches, settling on a general style for each song, fine tuning the tempos, and recording most of the process.Zaun Marshburn Zaun MarshburnWe’ve got an amazing group pulled together for this task.  In my last blog entry I mentioned possibly using a turntablist in place of  drummer, but I’m glad to say we’ve got Zaun Marshburn behind the drumkit, and his holistic approach has proven to be a very important part of this process. Since he has a deep appreciation for everything from classic Jazz to modern Hip Hop we have been able to tread fearlessly into just about any conceivable musical territory.   Add a similarly well versed Jon Petronzio playing bass and keys simultaneously, and we have a super efficient and capable rhythm section that can turn on a dime.What strikes me is this — even though my stated intention is to dramatically rework several Jorge Visions D100520elements of each of these pieces to make them feel more distinctly modern, I am pleasantly surprised to find that a fair amount of transformation of each song is inevitable just by us playing it! We can’t help but change the music, just because of who we are and how we play, and the chemistry of this particular combination of musicians. So for a few of these songs we are not going out of our way to change much of anything.  It just happens.  Like magic… but with no magician!Here’s a sample of our work: St. Louis BluesOn the other hand, this example (St. Louis Blues by WC Handy) falls into the opposite category… where we took elements of the original, threw ’em into a musical blender and ended up with something that WC Handy might not even recognize as his own song. Johnny Dowd is the creative Screen Shot 2013-12-15 at 9.23.34 AMmastermind behind this version. Compare it to this recording of the composer himself, or this one by the inimitable (Saint!) Louis Armstrong and think about how you might look at a problem you face today, and see it in a new way…Life is indeed full of possibilities! Related PostsA Year ReimaginedThroughout First Fest Ithaca’s New Year’s reimagined events, I couldn’t help but feel that, yes, here we are again, at this place on the wheel of the year, yet it’s a richer, wiser version of itself with more layers and nuance.Reimagineering a New Music GenreWhat happens when you take music from 100 years ago and reimagine the tracks in the context of everything that has come since (and possibly anticipate future trends in music)?Rethinking Life ReimaginedToday, Dr. Bill Thomas called me up and asked me a relatively straightforward question: do I think AARP’s Life Reimagined is having an impact on the lives of ChangingAging’s audience?Tweet3Share19ShareEmail22 SharesTags: 1914 Life Reimagined music New Year’slast_img read more

Roots Shoots and Fruits

first_imgby, Jeanette Leardi, ChangingAging ContributorTweet1ShareShare8Email9 SharesIn the workshops I facilitate on journaling, memoir writing, stress management, caregiver support, and ethical-will creation, one particular exercise resonates quite deeply with participants. Based on the organic structure of a tree (which is a great metaphor for life itself), the activity is a fun and revealing way to explore the influences and inspirations in one’s life and how they are transformed into meaningful passions and productive actions. I call it Roots, Shoots, and Fruits.Here’s how to do the exercise:On a piece of paper, draw the trunk of a tree. The trunk represents you.Now think about the people, experiences, and things that influence and/or nurture you in your life. For example, your faith, family members, and friends each might be a source of support. Perhaps you are greatly influenced by your experiences of travel, work, periods of crisis, or time in the military. You get the idea. Downward from the base of the trunk, draw and label a root that represents each such aspect in your life.Next, consider your passions and actions. Toward what activities do you direct your energies and spend your time? For example, you might focus some of your energy on volunteer work. And it’s very likely that you spend time doing things for and/or with your partner and/or children. You might also enjoy a particular hobby or play a certain sport. Each of these channels of your energy is a “shoot,” or branch, of your tree. Upward from the top part of the trunk, draw these shoots and label each one accordingly.Finally, look at each shoot on your tree. Ask yourself: “In what particular way am I living out this passion?” or “What specifically am I contributing to the world as a result of this effort?” In other words, what is the “fruit” of each labor? For example, if volunteering is one of your shoots, a fruit might be “tutoring a child,” “working at the food bank,” or “making quilts for shut-ins.” At the end of each shoot, draw and label one or more fruits that describe the results or end-products of your actions.By now you may realize that a root (such as “my partner”) can also be a shoot. Or a shoot (such as “photography”) may also be a root because the activity nurtures you. Or a fruit (your child) can be a root because of the love he or she provides in your life. That’s great. It indicates full-circle aspects to your life.As I said, this exercise is always a hit with my workshop participants. It provides a way for them to take stock of their lives and to recognize and appreciate the connections that help define who they are in the world. But the exercise has an additional benefit, one that has to do with proportion and balance.Some people have greater difficulty identifying their roots rather than their shoots/fruits. They are clearly able to name their passions as well as the many things that they do. But they can’t seem to cite specific people or events or values that provide stability and inspiration in their lives. For others, it’s just the opposite. They have no trouble acknowledging the influences in their lives, but they aren’t clear about the ways in which they contribute to the world through their actions or gifts.Another interesting effect occurs when someone recognizes a root, shoot, or fruit that has been withering for some time due to lack of attention or appreciation, and he or she resolves to invest more time and energy into nurturing that aspect back to life.Over the years, I’ve done this exercise in many workshops with participants of all ages. What is particularly remarkable is how much easier this activity tends to be for older adults than for young adults and middle-agers. Perhaps it’s because of the greater perspective elders have about their own lives and the longer amount of time they’ve had to consider this. And the trees of elders who are not isolated or depressed tend to be balanced between downward and upward entries.I’ve noticed, too, that the trees of young adults often have more roots than shoots/fruits. This is to be expected, since they are still evolving as individuals and discovering the ways they can contribute to the world. Middle-age adults, on the other hand, sometimes have more top-heavy trees. They can label many shoots and fruits, but they tend to lose awareness of their roots, influences, and sources of support. And maybe that’s a symptom of the drive to achieve that often preoccupies people in mid-career.But here’s what I’ve found most valuable about introducing my participants to Roots, Shoots, and Fruits. Since I began noticing these generational differences, I have encouraged my students to take this exercise beyond the classroom and do it again with family members of different ages. How, for example, might grandparents help their grandchildren to identify their gifts? How might they help their middle-age children restore themselves by tapping into their root influences? And how might grandkids and their parents better appreciate and aspire to grow the sturdier, more balanced tree of an engaged elder? And how different might a person’s own tree look as he or she repeats the exercise from time to time throughout life?Try this exercise, and pay attention to what it teaches you about yourself. I hope you’ll agree that if more of us spend time thinking about our Roots, Shoots, and Fruits –– and encourage others to do the same –– we will begin to cultivate a lush new forest of personal and social growth.Related PostsJournaling in the New YearWith this just the first week of 2012, your new year’s resolutions may still be fresh in your mind. But as Sandwiched Boomers, caring for aging parents and growing kids, chances are that won’t last. Writing down your goals and intentions in a journal…The Joy of Dolly Parton!This past Saturday I had the amazing pleasure and joy of attending Dolly Parton’s debut performance at The Hollywood Bowl! It was a perfect summer evening in Los Angeles…the Bowl was abuzz…the company was great….and everyone was excited for the long-awaited, much-anticipated Dolly concert! At 8:30pm sharp she appeared on…People PowerFor the 2017 ChangingAging Tour, we are taking a page from grassroots movements to break down boundaries and inspire genuine multi-generational engagement.Tweet1ShareShare8Email9 SharesTags: Care Partner Elderhood Journalinglast_img read more

Rutgers Cancer Institute educates childhood cancer survivors about late effects of treatment

first_img Source:https://www.cinj.org/helping-pediatric-cancer-survivors-better-understand-late-effects-treatment Jun 21 2018Facing pediatric cancer as a patient or caregiver is challenging enough, but to understand the impact of the late effects of treatment is equally challenging to this population. That is why Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey consistently educates childhood cancer survivors about this topic through its LITE Program. The effort is being further assisted by a $1,500 ‘Beyond the Cure’ educational survivorship conference grant from The National Children’s Cancer Society (NCCS) to support the annual Survivor’s Family Education Night taking place later this week. It is the third consecutive year NCCS is supporting the event through the grant.The LITE Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute provides long-term evaluation, support, and health education for the growing number of childhood cancer survivors. The program utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach to provide services for this population, including a pediatric hematologist/oncologist, advanced practice nurse, social worker, nutritionist, treatment nurses and access to medical specialists related to the management of long-term late effects. Collaborating with experts from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, as well as Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Children’s Specialized Hospital (both RWJBarnabas Health facilities), the LITE team also works with medical practitioners within the survivors’ own communities.”While pediatric cancer survivors and their families always receive information about treatment late effects when they’re here at Rutgers Cancer Institute, they may not be overly focused on it during their doctor’s visit, instead being more concerned with matters such as test results, making future appointments and other needs. By delivering this information in a non-clinical setting at our education night we have the ability to reach survivors in a more relaxed atmosphere. The event serves as an opportunity to embrace the health strategies presented before them and share experiences with their peers,” notes Rutgers Cancer Institute pediatric hematologist/oncologist and LITE Program Medical Director Margaret Masterson, MD, who is also an associate professor of pediatrics at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerThis year’s event will address cardiac late effects with experts from various clinical departments at Rutgers University. Past programs have focused on such topics as physical fitness, nutrition, fertility, stress management, neurocognitive late effects and 504 school accommodations.Robert Manduley, MD, a pediatric cardiologist and director of the Pediatric Echocardiograph Laboratory at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School will provide an update on cardiac long-term late effects after pediatric cancer treatment. Lori Magoulas, PhD, RD, a clinical dietitian/nutritionist who works with patients in the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute, will present strategies to re-establish healthy dietary habits, as well as review heart healthy dietary guidelines. A survivor panel discussion focusing on how to cope with cancer treatment late effects will round out the event.last_img read more

Researchers discover novel function of fibroblast growth factor 2 for spermatogonial stem

first_imgJun 30 2018A research team found a novel function of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), a self-renewal factor for spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) which is the origin of the sperm production. Although it has demonstrated that both FGF2 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is indispensable for SSC self-renewal and survival in vitro, the present study revealed that FGF2 showed the different properties from GDNF in mouse testis. This finding will contribute to the regulation of SSCs in vivo for the treatment of male infertility.This study was published in the June issued Stem Cell Reports.Related StoriesGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Research sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’Dr. Seiji Takashima, an Assistant Professor of the Faculty of Textile Science and Technology in Shinshu University and the corresponding author on the paper, successfully identified a novel function of FGF2 in mouse testis using a “biodegradable gelatin microsphere system” which is capable of sustained diffusion of self-renewal factors for several days in vivo.Consecutive production of sperm is ensured by the repeat of self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. It was well known that the self-renewal of SSCs is promoted by GDNF, while retinoic acid (RA) induces the differentiation toward sperm production. In 2015, Dr. Takashima found that FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2) also act as a self-renewal factor for SSCs in vitro. In the present study, his group demonstrated that FGF2 conversely acts as a differentiation promoting factor in vivo.They found that FGF2-stimulated SSCs frequently expressed a receptor for RA when compared to those stimulated by GDNF, suggesting that FGF2 expands differentiation-susceptible subset of SSCs. Simultaneously, they also demonstrated that this molecule acts on testicular microenvironment, which is required for SSC function, to facilitate RA action. These results demonstrate that FGF2, which was shown to be ‘bona fide self-renewal factor for SSCs in vitro’ in 2015, can conversely act to facilitate SSC differentiation in vivo. Considering that GDNF/FGF2 ratio shows dynamic change during testicular development and regeneration, the functional balance between GDNF and FGF2 might play a pivotal role in the regulation of sperm production from SSCs.The finding will contribute not only to understanding the principle of sperm production but also to future applications for male infertility treatment, breeding live stock, and conservation of endangered species. Source:http://www.shinshu-u.ac.jp/last_img read more

Unique FoodSwitch app suggests healthier alternatives

first_imgJul 6 2018Drop that yogurt. Instead, try this one with less sugar, fat and fewer unpronounceable additives.That’s the message from FoodSwitch -; a free mobile app developed by researchers from The George Institute and Northwestern University. Using FoodSwitch is like having a nutritionist at your side in the grocery store.”FoodSwitch is unique in that users don’t have to hunt for healthier alternatives. They’re all listed in the app,” said FoodSwitch collaborator Dr. Mark Huffman, associate professor of preventive medicine and medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine cardiologist.Unlike other nutrition apps, FoodSwitch asks users to crowdsource information on new and changing foods within the U.S. food supply to update the app’s 268,000-product database in real time. Given that 20 percent of the packaged foods in the U.S. turn over every year, having a constantly updated database helps track what is in the global food supply and how healthy it is.The app is available in Apple and Google Play stores. FoodSwitch USA was developed by The George Institute for Global Health in Australia in collaboration with Northwestern Medicine and Chicago-based Label Insight. Download FoodSwitch USA for iOS Download FoodSwitch USA for Android How the app worksWith a tap of the screen, users can scan a packaged food’s barcode, quickly see its nutritional rating and identify similar foods that are healthier. The app provides a simple Health Star Rating that scores each food between 0.5 stars (unhealthy) to 5 stars (healthiest). The scoring is based on a scientific algorithm that weights the impact of different nutrients on health. The app also provides a breakdown of the food’s fat, saturated fat, sugars and salt in grams and gives a percentage of an adult’s daily intake for each. This is shown as red, yellow and green traffic lights.When a food gets few stars or multiple red lights, consumers can see it’s high in fat, saturated fat, sugars and salt.Users also can compare multiple products in the same category, such as regular and fat-free salad dressing, to quickly determine which product is healthier.Crowdsourcing new and changing packaged food informationIf a user scans a barcode and the food is not in the database, the app prompts the user to photograph the packaging, its nutrition facts panel and ingredient list so the app’s team can add it to the database. This type of crowdsourcing is vital for the app’s success, Huffman said, because manufacturers frequently update or add products, and independent grocers carry foods that are not always found in mainstream grocery stores. There is an approximately 20 percent turnover in the U.S. food supply every year, he said.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patients”Our food supply is a big system that changes constantly,” Huffman said.Tracking the global food supplyPackaged food manufacturers change their products frequently, which can make it difficult to track how well they are reducing sodium, added sugars or saturated fats in their foods. FoodSwitch can help. As users crowdsource new information they find on packaged foods and update the FoodSwitch database, it will become easier to track what’s in the global food supply and how healthy it is.Huffman said it is important to empower individuals who know they should be eating healthful food but who don’t always have easy access to it. Since the app tells them which healthier alternatives are out there, consumers can demand those from their grocers, Huffman said.FoodSwitch has already launched successfully in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, India, China, South Africa and Hong Kong. By expanding the app’s reach to the U.S., which has the largest food supply in the world (about 400,000 foods compared to 150,000 foods in Australia), the number of foods in the FoodSwitch database should more than double.”The U.S. food supply is so large and so unique because this is a great country of immigrants,” Huffman said. “Whether it’s South-Asian foods or Ethiopian grocery stores, we’ll be able to capture that scope, size and detail.”SaltSwitch and other specialized diet filtersExcess sodium in one’s diet can lead to high blood pressure, the “silent killer,” and the majority of excess salt in peoples’ diets comes from processed foods.The American Heart Association says eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age,and reduce the risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.A SaltSwitch filter within the app can guide users to foods with less salt. During a recent grocery shopping trip, a SaltSwitch scan of a bag of Lay’s classic potato chips resulted in three red traffic lights (fat, saturated fat and sodium) and one green traffic light (sugar).The list of healthier alternatives suggested trying Lay’s Lightly Salted Potato Chips instead, which had only two red traffic lights (fat, saturated fat), one yellow traffic light (sodium) and one green (sugar).center_img Source:https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2018/june/foodswitch-health-app/last_img read more

Few tips to help avoid sunburns in summer

first_img Source:https://www.bidmc.org Pre-cancerous and cancerous skin lesions due to decreases in the skin’s immune function Mottled pigmentation, or discolored areas of the skin Sallowness, or a yellow discoloration of the skin Telangiectasias, or the dilation of small blood vessels under the skin Elastosis, or the destruction of the elastic and collagen tissue “The sun’s UV rays damage the DNA in the cells of your skin,” says Suzanne Olbricht, MD, Chief of Dermatology at BIDMC. “These harmful DNA changes can be quite profound and you will sometimes see the damage in the form of peeling skin.”Olbricht also notes that although your skin recovers when you are young, extended UV radiation can damage the cellular mechanisms that repair DNA. “That’s why the older you get, the more aged your skin looks, and the more skin cancers you may have,” she says. “Your repair mechanisms are damaged-;so just a little bit more sun can really affect your skin’s ability to repair itself.”All skin types can burn. Melanin, the component in your skin that determines pigment, plays a large role in natural skin protection from the sun’s UV rays. “The darker one’s skin, the more melanin is present and therefore the greater the UV protection,” Olbricht says. “But no matter the color, your skin can burn. Everyone should take precautions when heading out into the sun.”Here are a few tips to help avoid sunburns:Be choosy with your sunscreen.Look for a broad spectrum sunscreen, which protects against all types of harmful rays, and one with a strong sun protection factor (SPF). “SPF measures how well the sunscreen protects your skin compared to if you were not wearing it,” Olbricht says. “For example, if it normally takes 20 minutes for your skin to turn red, a product with SPF 15 will typically prevent sunburn 15 times longer.”Related StoriesDon’t ignore diastolic blood pressure values, say researchersUCR scientists decode genome of black-eyed peasEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsApply sunscreen generously and reapply regularly.For the best protection, you typically need one ounce, or a shot glass full, of sunscreen to cover your entire body, including your face, ears and scalp. “A rule of thumb for reapplying is every two hours,” Olbricht says. “But if you’re swimming or sweating a lot, you will want to reapply more often.”Avoid peak hours in the sun.The sun’s rays are the strongest between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., meaning your skin is most susceptible to burning. Seek shade during these peak hours.Wear protective attire.Sunglasses with UV protection, a wide-brimmed hat, and clothing with UPF protection (ultraviolet protection factor) will help protect you from the sun. “A lot of children’s summer clothing and swim attire can be found with UPF 50+, which helps block 98% of UVA/UVB rays,” Olbricht says.Perform your own skin checks and get your skin checked regularly by your doctor.A self-exam of your skin once a month will help you keep track of any irregularities. Learn the pattern of any moles, blemishes or freckles so that you will notice any changes. “Most people have moles, and almost all are harmless,” Olbricht says. “But it is important to recognize changes in a mole, such as its size, shape or color. If you notice changes, call your primary care doctor or dermatologist for a checkup.”center_img Jul 18 2018It’s all fun in the sun until you realize you should have reapplied more sunscreen. Sunburns are no fun, but more importantly, they are dangerous. This reddening of your skin caused by overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation may seem like just a temporary irritation- but it can cause long-lasting damage.Overexposure to the sun can result in:last_img read more

Exposure to tobacco smoke can considerably impact health of teens

first_img“Additionally, health professionals can help parents and family members establish home and car smoking bans,” Merianos says. Source:https://www.uc.edu/news/articles/2018/08/n200151.html Aug 22 2018As little as one hour of exposure to tobacco smoke per week can significantly impact the health of teens, according to a University of Cincinnati study published in the September 2018 issue of Pediatrics.”There is no safe level of secondhand smoke exposure,” says Ashley Merianos, the lead author of the study and an assistant professor in UC’s School of Human Services. “Even a small amount of exposure can lead to more emergency department visits and health problems for teens. That includes not just respiratory symptoms, but lower overall health.”The study, “Adolescent Tobacco Smoke Exposure, Respiratory Symptoms, and Emergency Department Utilization,” used data from a 2014-15 national survey that looks at tobacco use and related health issues among U.S. people 12 years old and above. A total of 7,389 nonsmoking teens without asthma were included in the study.The study found that teens exposed to tobacco smoke were at higher risk of having respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath and a dry cough at night. It also found that smoke-exposed teens were more likely to seek treatment at an urgent care or hospital emergency department.The study also found that adolescents exposed to tobacco smoke were more likely to find it hard to exercise, including wheezing during and after exercise. They were also found to be more likely to report that they frequently missed school due to illness than unexposed teens.The American Academy of Pediatrics — which publishes Pediatrics — considers tobacco use a pediatric disease due to the negative health effects associated with secondhand smoke exposure. Despite significant progress in tobacco control, over one-third (35 percent) of U.S. nonsmoking adolescents without asthma were exposed to tobacco smoke for an hour or more within the prior seven days, according to the study.Related StoriesPublic health concerns as MPs’ connection to organization part-funded by tobacco industry revealedLow rates of recommended treatment for tobacco dependence in patients hospitalized with SUDsSmoking ban in prisons reduces levels of second-hand smokeTeens exposed to just one hour of secondhand smoke per week are: 1.5 times more likely to find it harder to exercise; two times more likely to experience wheezing during or after exercise; two times more likely to have a dry cough at night; and 1.5 times more likely to miss school due to illness.Merianos concluded that more must be done to curb adolescent exposure to secondhand smoke. “Healthcare providers or other health professionals can offer counseling to parents and other family members who smoke to help them quit smoking, and parents should be counseled on how to prevent and reduce their adolescent’s secondhand smoke exposure,” she says. “Also, health professionals should educate teens on the dangers associated with tobacco use to prevent initiation.”Merianos calls for medical professionals to follow “the 5 A’s,” the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for treating tobacco use and dependence:center_img Ask about tobacco use during every teen’s visit; Advise the teen or family member to quit; Assess the willingness of the teen or family member to make an attempt to quit; Assist the willing teen or family member with an attempt to quit by offering medication, counseling and/or supplementary materials including hotline information; and Arrange for a follow-up visit or contact.last_img read more

Taking a Shot at a Tropical Killer

Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email A vaccine against the disease leishmaniasis could save tens of thousands of lives every year. Now, scientists report that they have used snippets of DNA to spur mice to fight back against the parasites responsible for the illness, an approach they hope to soon begin testing in people.Leishmaniasis is caused by microscopic parasites of the genus Leishmania; some 20 different species can sicken humans. Leishmaniasis hits poor residents of tropical countries the hardest. The sandflies that spread the disease are silent and smaller than a mosquito. After a sandfly’s bite injects them into the body, Leishmania cells can attack the skin or mucous membranes, causing ulcers or disfiguring lesions. In an often lethal variety of the disease, they damage the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Although the disease’s toll isn’t certain, estimates suggest there are about 1.3 million new cases and up to 40,000 deaths each year.Leishmania parasites are tricky foes, and so far no vaccine has received approval for use in humans. One challenge is that the parasites lay low inside our cells, out of reach of the antibodies triggered by most other vaccines. The key to eradicating these sheltered invaders, researchers suspect, is stimulating the immune cells known as T cells. Although two experimental leishmaniasis vaccines that use this strategy have undergone preliminary safety and effectiveness tests in people, the best method for enlisting T cells isn’t clear. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Immunologist Peter Walden of Charité University Medicine Berlin and colleagues decided to try a DNA vaccine, a type of vaccine that is good at inciting T cells. Such vaccines contain DNA strands coding for proteins from a pathogen. Cells in the vaccine recipient’s body absorb the DNA and start churning out the proteins—also called antigens—which alert the immune system and prime it to attack if a real infection occurs.First, the researchers had to choose the right antigens. They settled on five different proteins that vary little across Leishmania samples from a range of species found around the world. To determine whether the antigens galvanize human T cells, the team obtained blood samples from people in India and Tunisia who had recovered from the disease or had been exposed to it without getting sick. They found that portions of all five proteins sparked a response by T cells from the blood samples.The researchers’ final vaccine mixture, which they tested in mice, contained five kinds of DNA strands, each coding for all or part of one of the proteins. The vaccine stimulated the mice to produce defenses against leishmaniasis parasites, Walden and colleagues report online today in Science Translational Medicine. T cells from the vaccinated animals reacted vigorously to Leishmania antigens. To confirm that the vaccine helped the animals combat the invaders, the researchers injected the mice with cells of one Leishmania species. Three weeks later, mice that received the highest vaccine dose carried 94% fewer parasites in their liver than did mice that received a control shot. Although some parasites remained in the mice that received the largest dose, Walden says there weren’t enough of them to cause disease symptoms.“We are ready for human trials,” he says. The vaccine should provide protection against different human Leishmania species, he adds, because the selected antigens are the same across species.Immunologist Paul Kaye of the University of York in the United Kingdom agrees that the time for human trials has come. “There is every reason to believe that they should move forward as soon as possible,” says Kaye, who’s excited that there are now three vaccines to try in humans. Kaye and colleagues’ own vaccine candidate, which stimulates T cells with a harmless virus that carries sections of two Leishmania genes, has already undergone a safety study in people, but the results have not yet been published.“This is a significant advance,” says vector biologist Jesus Valenzuela of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Rockville, Maryland. Walden’s group deserves credit for using human blood samples to identify the antigens, he says; other vaccine developers have used rodents.Leishmaniasis is one of the neglected tropical diseases for which research cash is hard to obtain. Still, Walden is hopeful that he and his colleagues will find financing for safety trials. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe read more

Geopolitics disrupt scientific exchange with Russia

The conflicting signals from DOE are frustrating researchers. “This is the biggest fusion meeting of the year. Especially now, with ITER at such a critical phase, one would want to participate in the meeting,” Meade says. The irony, he says, is that the $17.5 billion ITER collaboration grew out of efforts in the 1980s to improve scientific ties between the Soviet Union and the West. “One of the original goals of the project was to use scientific research to ease tensions during the Cold War. This is now being replayed in reverse,” Meade says.Plans for meetings in other fields have also been disrupted. Physicist Geoffrey Bodwin of Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois, was invited to give a plenary talk at a meeting on subatomic particles next month in St. Petersburg, one of several U.S. government scientists listed on the conference website as participants. But Bodwin, who declined to comment, has not been able to get approval for his travel. DOE did not respond to questions about Bodwin’s case, noting only in a statement to ScienceInsider that “[g]iven the current standing of the United States’ relationship with Russia, the Department of Energy closely evaluates all cooperative interactions with the Russian Federation on a case by case basis.”Another meeting that will lose a prominent speaker is an international confab on extremophiles in St. Petersburg next month. Russian-born plenary speaker Eugene Koonin, a biologist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information in Bethesda, Maryland, recently canceled his attendance, he says, for “various reasons … some of them personal.” He declined to specify the reasons.Other meetings have fared better. Vladimir Poroikov, a computational biologist at the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry in Moscow, was concerned that tensions would disrupt a meeting he is chairing later this summer in St. Petersburg on chemical-biological interactions. A sponsor from Ukraine, not surprisingly, canceled its involvement, forcing Poroikov to find other funding. But he says that turnout is looking good. Russia has placed no restrictions on foreign scientists, Poroikov says, and the 300 attendees include several from the United States including the plenary speaker, Marc Nicklaus of the National Cancer Institute.Most Russian-U.S. research projects appear to be weathering the geopolitical storm. Scientists at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received approval from the National Security Council for a joint research cruise last month to sample the Bering Strait under a long-term monitoring project called RUSALCA. One possible casualty is nascent projects getting started under the U.S.-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission in health, environmental, and information sciences. A State Department official told ScienceInsider in a statement that “in response to Russia’s illegal intervention in Ukraine” some of that research has been “postponed.” But the official declined to say which projects. He added:“In general, the United States considers scientific work to be vital to U.S. national interests and we are not seeking to isolate Russia’s society.  We are reviewing all bilateral engagement on a case by case basis, but believe it is in our interest to work together with Russia on scientific research.”Restrictions on U.S.-Russian collaborations may be “understandable” given the circumstances, says Michael Lubell, director of public affairs at the American Physical Society in Washington, D.C., but “you’d like to have scientific exchanges not tainted by the politics.” Email Tensions with Russia over the unrest in Ukraine are inflicting collateral damage on science. ScienceInsider has learned that several U.S. scientists have pulled out of upcoming conferences in Russia.Some cancellations stem from policy guidance that the U.S. government issued to agencies this spring to clamp down on travel by government scientists to Russia. Based on that guidance, NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) announced in April that they would block most government travel to Russia; other agencies are reviewing and in some cases not allowing such travel. “There has been some diplomatic pushing and shoving behind the scenes,” says Dale Meade, a physicist emeritus with the U.S. DOE’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey.Some DOE scientists who had planned to attend the International Atomic Energy Agency’s conference on fusion in St. Petersburg in October have requested permission to travel there but have not received any guidance. The approval process for travel to Russia is shrouded in secrecy, says Rita Guenther, a program officer at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., who is tracking the issue. “There is no one policy that all agencies share. Each meeting is looked at independently, and each instance of scientific cooperation is looked at independently.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Hey want to hang out Pheromone cocktail traps bedbugs

first_imgBedbugs (Cimex lectularius) are notoriously hard to find before they multiply, making them very difficult to eradicate. But now researchers have a new way to fight them. Scientists are reporting a combination of six chemicals that lure and trap bedbugs online this week in Angewandte Chemie International Edition. The chemical cocktail mimics the bedbugs’ natural aggregation pheromone, which signals if a location is safe for them to hang out, as those pictured above are doing. To identify the chemicals in the pheromone, the researchers extracted compounds from 18,000 bedbug molts using solvents and dried bedbug feces using heat. They separated and identified each compound, then tested how bedbugs respond to synthetic versions of each. The researchers found five volatile molecules—dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and 2-hexanone—that attract the bedbugs and one, histamine, that makes the bugs stay put. The six chemicals, when used in baits in a bedbug-infested residential apartment, trapped seven times more bedbugs than control baits without chemicals and did not discriminate between bedbug gender, age, or physiological condition. Monitoring a chemical bait in one location is much simpler than traditional bedbug detection measures like looking for bedbugs in bedding or furniture, the team says. The researchers are working to design low-cost bedbug traps based on this chemical cocktail and aim to commercialize a trap next year.last_img read more

Podcast The rise of skeletons speciesblurring hybrids and getting rightfully ditched by

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe To prevent such damage, researchers have long sought ways to keep nutrients from leaching from farm soils. And recently, they’ve taken a fresh look at using gypsum, a soft white or gray mineral also known as calcium sulfate dihydrate, to help keep phosphorous where it is wanted.It’s an old concept. U.S. farmers have been treating fields with gypsum since George Washington was president. In part, that’s because sulfate in the gypsum binds with magnesium in the soil, helping the soil hold water. But pollution specialists are more interested in the calcium in the gypsum; it binds with phosphate in soil, forming a larger particle that resists being washed away.Fertilizer companies once routinely mixed gypsum into their products, but that practice faded. And because the mineral traditionally came from mines, shipping was prohibitively expensive. “Somewhere in that shuffle we forgot about gypsum,” says Francisco Arriaga, a soil scientist at the University of Wisconsin (UW) in Madison.But researchers saw a possible comeback for gypsum as nutrient pollution problems grew and coal-fired power plants proliferated. Many plants are equipped with equipment—dubbed scrubbers—that use lime to remove pollutants. The chemical reactions involved produce a form of gypsum known as flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. A lot of FGD gypsum ends up in landfills, but companies also use it to make wallboard and cement. In part, that’s because it is relatively cheap: A ton of mined gypsum can cost as much as $140, whereas a ton of FGD gypsum costs $38.Farmers are also allowed to use FGD gypsum on their fields, and over the past decade scientists have begun research projects in seven states examining how it affects crops and soils. Here in Wisconsin, Dan Johnson’s farm is one of three study sites selected by Arriaga and other UW researchers. They are working in cooperation with the Sand County Foundation, a nonprofit based in Madison, and We Energies, an energy company that runs a coal-fired power plant just 160 kilometers away in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.On Johnson’s farm, the potential for polluted runoff from steep slopes is high, making it an ideal study site, says Greg Olson, the field projects director for the Sand County Foundation. The project is of particular interest to Olson’s group because of growing concern about polluted runoff creating oxygen-poor dead zones in the Great Lakes.In 2014, Johnson started applying gypsum, obtained from a We Energies facility just 10 kilometers from his farm, to about 4 hectares. (The treatment lasts 2 to 3 years.) “We’re doing a chemistry experiment in the soil,” Olson says. Gypsum not only can make phosphorus particles “less mobile,” but increase the amount of water available to crops and reduce runoff.Preliminary results—which Arriaga will present at a Soil Science Society of America conference this month—suggest gypsum is helping keep phosphorous in Johnson’s soils. And previous field experiments, including projects in Georgia and Ohio, have found that the mineral can also can reduce levels of toxic aluminum and pathogens in soils, as well as provide a source of calcium and sulfur, two nutrients plants need to grow. (Now that power plants emit less sulfur, which used to fall back to land in the form of acid precipitation and dust, some soils are deficient in that nutrient.)Still, FGD gypsum may have some downsides. For one, if heavy rains wash gypsum into waterways, it could liberate phosphorus stored in river sediments, adding the nutrient to the water column. (Heavier rains are one anticipated effect of climate change in the Midwest.)Another other issue is gypsum’s availability. Coal-fired power plants are shuttering thanks in part to stricter emissions laws and low natural gas prices. And as the plants close, they will stop producing gypsum. “In 20 to 30 years time, gypsum will again be in short supply and farmers will be scrambling,” predicts soil scientist Malcolm Sumner, emeritus faculty at the University of Georgia in Athens. Until then, researchers say they will continue trying to understand where FGD gypsum might be helpful in curbing polluted runoff.This story was made possible in part by reporting support from the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country CAMPBELLSPORT, WISCONSIN—When it rains, a river flows through a shed on Dan Johnson’s farm here. The runoff trickles through his crop fields, then beneath a small white structure where a pump sucks up small water samples. When the water fills a 20-liter jug, researchers collect it and test it for the presence of phosphorus.The setup is part of an experiment aimed at testing an unusual water pollution control scheme that uses gypsum, a waste product from coal-fired power plants, to reduce nutrient runoff from farms.Here in a heartland of U.S. agriculture, a growing number of farmers are spraying manure produced by animal feeding operations—which can raise thousands of animals on relatively small plots of land—across vast swaths of cropland. The phosphorus and nitrogen in the dung help fertilize crops. But when the nutrients wash into waterways, they can spur algal blooms that ultimately suffocate aquatic ecosystems. last_img read more

Smart labels could tell you when to toss food and makeup as

first_img By Giorgia GuglielmiAug. 21, 2017 , 5:00 AM Smart labels could tell you when to toss food and makeup, as this video shows Is it safe to eat the leftover cheese in the fridge or put on the eye shadow that has been in your cabinet for several years? A smart label could help. That’s the hope of a team of researchers who have developed a new sensor containing nanostructures that change color when they bind to compounds that indicate spoilage or contamination by bacteria. Whereas currently available sensors use liquid solutions that migrate on channels, the newly developed sensor has all the reagents incorporated in a postage stamp–sized piece of paper. This means it can be directly applied to the samples that have to be tested; for example, it could be added to makeup packaging or dabbed onto leftover food. The researchers, who will present their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C., have already used the paper sensor to detect antioxidant compounds in tea and wine, which could be used for authentication purposes. But the sensor, they add, could also be used to identify new medicinal plants or natural sources of antioxidants in remote areas such as the Amazon rainforest.last_img read more