The anti-Wada ‘lynch mob’ is not one Vernon Kay and co would recognise

first_imgSign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks. Since you’re here… Support The Guardian Share via Email Inconceivable! Russia yet again leaves Sir Craig Reedie looking the fool Sport politics Encouraging news for the embattled Wada president, Sir Craig Reedie, as the founder Wada president, Dick Pound, rides eye-catchingly to his defence. By way of recap, Russia last week missed the deadline to allow the World Anti‑Doping Agency access to the Moscow laboratory that was at the heart of its massive state-sponsored doping programme. This deadline was itself a bizarre act of faith on Wada’s part, given that Russia has failed to comply with two crucial recommendations of the McLaren report which uncovered the vast scale of their cheating.Anyway, the predictably missed deadline has gone down like the proverbial sandwich with many national anti-doping authorities, as well as many clean athletes who increasingly despair of the notion that Wada is run in their interests, and not those of states to which Wada’s main funder, the IOC, may wish to cosy up.But they’re all wrong, apparently. Dick has penned an article in which he explains that the reaction “has all the elements of a lynch mob”. Does it? I hesitate to resort to a Family Fortunes analogy, given the subject matter. But if you asked a hundred people what “all the elements of a lynch mob” were, and we pictured Vernon Kay waiting for the percentages to pop up on the big screen, I imagine our survey would have said something quite different. “Forty-nine people said ‘racists’,” Vernon might reveal. “Forty-one said ‘noose’ …. Seven said Deep South … I’m sorry, we’ve got nothing for ‘despairing anti-doping executives’ or ‘some newspaper articles’. Athletes, you have a chance to steal.” Russia doping scandal Wayne Rooney arrested in US for public intoxication and swearing Drugs in sport Read more Read more Wada experts set to return to Russia to investigate doping data after IT row … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Topics Share on Facebook I can’t help feeling there is rather a lot of this naivety to Reedie (and now to his defender, Pound). Back last year when he was justifying the decision to chuck the Russians a bone, Reedie described the notion that Russia might miss the deadline as “inconceivable”. He must now conceive of such a thing, but the damage caused to his organisation – and, by more important extension, to the believability of sport – has been serious. If Wada continues to misidentify its enemies, it may become critical.Rooney’s Saudi trip arresting in itselfAnd so to news that Wayne Rooney was arrested and fined last month at a Washington airport, after being accused of intoxication in a public place and swearing at police. According to his spokesman, Rooney was “disorientated” after taking “a prescribed amount of sleeping tablets mixed with some alcohol consumption”. He was on a private flight back from a one-day promotional trip to Saudi Arabia.The feelings of DC airport cops notwithstanding, some will find the Saudi Arabia element of the tale the most distasteful, for all the good it might have done Rooney’s business. Saudi Arabia is a country where women have historically not even been allowed into football stadiums. That all changed this time last year, you may recall, as part of a much-praised drive by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to “reform” his country, which was all going so well until his operatives murdered and dismembered a prominent journalist inside an embassy. Still, you will note that MBS has shaken off the haters in a very “you do you” way, and is continuing to bomb and starve Yemenis into the world’s deepest humanitarian catastrophe with the various weapons we continue to sell his family.center_img Sportblog Share on WhatsApp International Olympic Committee Olympic Games Share on LinkedIn Wada Share on Pinterest Leaving aside the question of whether it is remotely appropriate to cast an equivalence between robust criticism and actual lynching, Dick’s suggestion that the criticism is driven by ignorance of due process simply doesn’t stand up. Not only did Wada row back on its own terms for Russian readmission, but Reedie’s own predecessor in the president’s chair, David Howman, accused the agency of bowing to pressure. “This looks like they have taken the decision to deviate from a carefully put-together roadmap for entirely pragmatic reasons,” he judged. “Wada has gone from being an organisation that cared about clean athletes to one that cares about international federations that have not been able to stage events in Russia: it’s money over principle.”Reading Pound’s defence of Reedie’s stewardship, it is hard not to see Wada as just another club of the same sort of men who stick together. Of more immediate concern is its apparent faith that the Russian authorities are also chaps cut from similar cloth.In Michael Cockerell’s documentary about the great offices of state, a former foreign office official outlined something called “the Wykehamist fallacy”. “Intelligence failures very often come not because you can’t see what’s happening,” he smiled wryly, “but because you misinterpret the intentions. You read their intentions as if they’d been educated at Winchester, you know, and they haven’t been – they’re a bunch of thugs. And actually their intentions aren’t our sort of intentions, and they may not be bluffing – they may be out to do something catastrophically dangerous.” Share on Twitter Sorry, where were we? Ah yes. Football. Of course.With regards to Rooney, there is something very “football now” about getting wasted on top of your Ambien as you are private jetted from 18 hours’ sportswashing duty in arguably the ghastliest country in the world, back to Washington DC where you are seeing out your playing days far from home, and without even the sunshine lifestyle benefits so often touted as the perks of an LA Galaxy contract.I’m not saying Rooney has suffered enough for this latest misdemeanour, or even that he was aware of why a trip to Saudi should be right down his to-do list. But none of this is really the football you dream of when you’re a kid, is it, and all the money in the world can’t self-medicate that. Marina Hyde comment Share on Messenger Read more Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Mark Allen quits match with 11 reds left on ‘disgusting’ World Grand Prix table

first_imgTopics Share on Twitter Read more Share on LinkedIn “We all make mistakes. I read in the paper the other day that Sergio García hacked up a couple of greens and went into one in a bunker and you think to yourself ‘What’s he got to worry about?’“But you get so entrenched in what you’re doing and you are so frustrated, because it is your life. This sport is my life and golf is Sergio’s life and it doesn’t make an excuse but it gives a reason.”The World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association rules state that “each member shall perform and compete to the best of his ability in each tournament in which he competes” and players are subject to disciplinary action if they concede a frame it is mathematically possible to win. Snooker Since you’re here… news Reuse this content Sign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks. … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.center_img The Northern Irishman immediately conceded the frame, and with it the match, to gift Carter a place in the quarter-finals, where he will play David Gilbert.Asked if he regretted his actions, Allen said: “Not at all. I don’t regret much that I’ve done over the years.”Describing the condition of the match table as “disgusting”, Allen added: “It’s out of character but it’s just the way I felt today. What’s the point of the audience watching me miss more and more?“I felt like I had to hit the ball so hard to move the white. It was really heavy and then you get annoyed because you look over at table two and it looks to be playing beautifully. I think if I had played on I would have smashed my cue up.”Allen, who is sixth in the world rankings, later took to Twitter to apologise for his performance: “Bad day at the office. Sorry to anyone who had to watch that..”Carter told ITV4: “We both started missing a lot and I think Mark missed the yellow there and he just saw red. We’ve all done it and fortunately for me it gives me the match, but I didn’t want to win like that. Share on Facebook Share on Messenger Share via Email Support The Guardian Mark Allen faces a fine from World Snooker after conceding a match-winning frame with 11 reds still left on the table at the World Grand Prix.The former Masters champion was 3-1 down to Ali Carter and trailing 20 points to two in the fifth frame when he missed a straightforward yellow and screwed the white ball back into the middle pocket. Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Ronnie O’Sullivan hits out over ‘urine’ smell at English Open snooker venuelast_img read more

Portrush Orange parade gives the Open an embarrassing problem

first_img Support The Guardian Share on Messenger Since you’re here… Share on WhatsApp Sportblog US sports … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Topics Reuse this content commentcenter_img The Open Share on Twitter Share via Email Golf Share on Pinterest Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook When the Portrush Sons of Ulster’s Facebook page becomes essential reading, you realise this year’s Open is no ordinary championship.As the third round of the final major of the year concludes, spectators will exit Royal Portrush to the sound of flutes and drums. The R&A wants us to cast our minds dreamily back to 1951, when Max Faulkner triumphed on Antrim’s north coast; Saturday evening will instead catapult us back to 1690 and the Battle of the Boyne.In what has been billed as a “celebration of marching bands”, a three-hour concert will take place from 6.30pm in the centre of the town. The performers are listed on social media as if it were as natural as Glastonbury (which, in respect of Northern Ireland, you can make the reasonable case it is).The William King Memorial band start proceedings, followed in half‑hour slots by the Derryloran Boyne Defenders, Dunloy Accordion, Ballykeel Loyal Sons of Ulster and Moneyslane Flute Band. The Drumderg Loyalists will round things off from 9pm. The Sons of Ulster will then march to an Orange hall. There is naturally a comedic, ludicrous undertone to this in 2019 but when placed on the Open’s doorstep it is a horrendously embarrassing look.American guests will probably look on with intrigue. What, though, of the thousands of Open fans from the predominantly Catholic Republic of Ireland?To suggest Orange parades are intrinsically linked to paramilitary behaviour or directly incite violence would be hugely unfair but shows such as this represent a depressing throwback to a Northern Ireland beset by sectarian division.Twenty-one years on from the Good Friday agreement, loyalists still mark William of Orange’s Boyne victory with anthems and bonfires, many of the latter featuring tricolour flags or effigies of the pope. This is about as far from an epitome of social inclusion as you could find.It is the Northern Ireland that will not feature on advertising campaigns for one of the world’s biggest sporting events. It does not, either, on the Causeway Coast & Glens borough council’s what’s on guide for July alongside the Open, a maritime festival and food tours. Middle-aged men belting out The Sash does not tend to have a wider resonance. Sky Sports Golf will not deliver a special outside broadcast.The perception has been allowed to linger that the concert’s organisers are doing the Open and its organisers something of a favour. In 2018, 48 bands took part with YouTube footage showing marchers being applauded through Portrush streets.“This is a decision that has taken us several months to come to, as there were many factors to take into consideration,” said the Sons of Ulster. “The main reason being is that all car parks in the town are occupied because of the Open.“It was important we came to some sort of compromise and had something happening in the town on the date of our parade. It was only after months of talks with the Causeway Coast and Glens Council, the Police Service of Northern Ireland, R&A and Translink that we were able to come to this decision. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the parties listed above, as they all wanted to work with the band to allow us to have something on the night.”Taking this at face value, availability of parking spaces was the biggest barrier to a festival of Orange and, more controversially, the R&A was anxious the show went on. If that raises an eyebrow, the same applies to the R&A’s claim that it “doesn’t have a position” on the concert. For context: a year ago, when premises adjacent to the Open at Carnoustie erected a branded golf simulator in its garden, the R&A took to sending snippy edicts asking that it was removed owing to what it perceived as negative imagery. Celebrations of a 17th‑century battle, as linked to more recent decades of bigotry and tragic civil unrest? Shrug.In fairness to the R&A, this invidious position is not at all of its doing. History tells us when third parties try to block Orange walks in Northern Ireland, the backlash is not pretty. A spokesman for Northern Ireland’s parades commission highlighted the 4,000 that took place last year with “the majority” causing no concern.He added: “The commission has not received objections nor complaints about this notified parade, nor has it received any information regarding sensitivities about it. The commission has, therefore, not considered it. By way of context, there are around 30 parades in Portrush each year, none of which are deemed ‘sensitive’ and, therefore, none of which are considered by the commission.”The police are similarly relaxed, albeit their response to questions focused solely on logistics. Wider perception and the dreadful look in respect of the Open is not their domain.“Organisers of the parade worked closely with representatives of Causeway Coast and Glens council and PSNI to tailor the parade this year to facilitate the large amount of visitors and traffic expected in Portrush on this date,” said Supt John Magill. “PSNI and organisers have devised a traffic management solution for bands attending to take part in the concert and parade. PSNI have an extensive operation planned to facilitate the Open in its entirety which includes arrangements for the concert and parade.”In continuing with what they have always done on this particular Saturday, the Portrush Sons of Ulster are seeking to “use this opportunity to show all those who will be visiting for the Open what our culture is all about.” The sporting world waits with bated breath.last_img read more

53C heat and melted shoes: is the 135-mile Badwater the world’s toughest race?

first_imgUltrarunning Facebook Billed as the toughest footrace in the world, the 36th annual Badwater 135 starts at Badwater Basin in Death Valley, 28ft below sea level, where athletes begin a 135-mile non-stop run over three mountain ranges in extreme mid-summer desert heat to finish at 8,350-foot near Mount Whitney for a total cumulative vertical ascent of 13,000ft. Photograph: David McNew/Getty Images Facebook Runners pass a heat danger warning sign during the Badwater 135 Ultramarathon. Photograph: David McNew/Getty Images Twitter Since you’re here… Share on Facebook Share via Email Now that the 62 miles were behind him, as well as the highs of the last 15, Collins was exhausted, daunted by the 38 miles ahead he had to face alone. He picked up his legs.Collins also had Badwater, a mere three weeks away, on his mind. At 28, he would be the youngest competitor in the race, and the 100-miler he was currently running was in part in preparation for Badwater. Could he keep his hydration at a high enough level? He would need it for Badwater’s heat. Aware of his tendency to go out too strong, he had begun today’s race at a moderate pace. At Alley Pond Park in Queens, around 51 miles into the race, he took down four Dixie cups of pickle juice, savoring the salty brine of electrolytes and greedy for more.Collins had been behind on training. “Intramural hockey games probably don’t get you ready for the hardest race in the world,” Collins said, laughing at his attempts to stay fit as he finished up his MBA at Wharton Business School in Philadelphia. At times, he would come home from a night out with classmates and head out on a run at 5am. “Maybe because we’re a little younger, we definitely have more of a cowboy attitude,” Collins said about running ultramarathons with his pacer for Badwater, another college cross country buddy.But Badwater is the first race he’s pored over online resources for information on how to run the course, even sparing a few minutes during the Great New York 100-miler to talk to the race director, who ran Badwater, for tips.Since then, he has run two to three 20-mile runs a week in his parents’ basement, with the space heaters cranked up until he blew a fuse and had to rearrange the outlets. On the other days of the week, he runs up to six miles, and will sit in the sauna set at 160F for as long he can handle. “The heat impacts everything else,” he said. “If you’re not keeping cool, keeping smart, then you fall behind on electrolytes, which means your body can’t take in food, which means you can’t really move forward, and you’re cramping.”Collins’ training is in sharp contrast with Chapman-Markle. After her first ultramarathon (or marathon for that matter), a 100-miler through the woods in Texas aged 55 that left her hypothermic, dangerously dehydrated, and with a stress fracture in right tibia, her grown children drove her to the hospital, where she had IV fluids hooked up to her arm. “No more, Mom,” they told her. “Try something else.”Chapman-Markle instead decided to do more research on how to properly train for an ultramarathon. Forty-five ultramarathons later, six this year alone, and after two years focusing on proper form, Chapman-Markle has a strenuous, consistent training schedule and strict recovery routine. She has not only remained healthy, but has been breaking USA Track & Field records for her age group and is pursuing the world records now. Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Pinterest Running At 9.30pm on 23 July 2018, the second wave of runners lined up at Badwater Basin in Death Valley, 280 feet below sea level. The heat from the day had not cooled and the temperature was 118F (48C), even though the sun had long since gone down. To make matters worse, it was abnormally humid for the California desert. Sixty-two-year-old Pamela Chapman-Markle looked down the line of racers, recognizing about half the competitors from previous years. On a normal day she would be heading to bed in a half hour, and although her heart was racing with anticipation, she was already tired, acutely aware that she was about to miss two nights of sleep.The starting gun fired and the runners set off on an incline. There would be 14,600ft of cumulative elevation for the runners to climb over the course of the 135-mile race ahead.Chapman-Markle tried to calm her emotions and steady her heart rate. Five miles in, her throat was already sore from the still drier air, a drastic shift from the 90% humidity she trained in. With no light pollution, she could see the stars clearly, but at 62, her vision at night wasn’t as good as it used to be, so she relied on a waist belt to light her path. For the first 20 miles, she passed runners, while others passed by her. Soon though, she wouldn’t see anyone for long stretches.Chapman-Markle would have to run the first 42 miles by herself before her crew could pace her just before daybreak. And even then, her pacers would follow behind her single file and switch off every five miles, returning to the cool air conditioning of the car Chapman-Markle’s husband drove up ahead. Chapman-Markle would have to do with ice. Ice she put down her sports bra, ice she chewed, ice water she drank as she tried to contend with the overwhelming heat.Last year, Chapman-Markle finished the Badwater 135 Ultramarathon in 34hr 30min, setting a record in the women’s 60-plus age group for a third year in a row. Now 63, Chapman-Markle is the oldest female competitor in the race with designs on beating her record yet again. She is one of 95 competitors from 21 countries and 30 states accepted to run the ultramarathon this year.The 135-mile race, which takes place this year from 15-17 July starting in Death Valley and and ending at Whitney Portal, 8,300ft above sea level, is often referred to as “the world’s toughest footrace”. Badwater 135 is considered by many ultrarunners to be the crown jewel of ultramarathons, which are defined as anything longer than a marathon. Temperatures climbed as high as 127F (53C) last year, and the asphalt road can get even hotter, causing the road to burn to runners’ feet. Chapman-Markle had the soles on three pairs of shoes melt last year. The race traverses three valleys and three mountain ranges, and after 122 grueling miles, runners face a steep final ascent to Whitney Portal at an elevation of 8360ft. Twitter Badwater Ultramarathon winner Pam Reed collapses in exhaustion while talking to the media just after finishing the race on the shoulder of Mt Whitney in 2015. Photograph: Richard Hartog/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images US sports … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.center_img features Share on LinkedIn Support The Guardian Twitter Marathon Topics Pinterest A runner cools off during the Badwater 135. Photograph: Ron Jones/Badwater.com Share on WhatsApp Based in Galveston, Texas, Chapman-Markle runs in 38C weather with 90% humidity regularly, hitting the roads around 2 or 3pm on the weekdays while the sun is still high in the sky when she gets home from her job as a nurse anesthetist. Every other weekend, Chapman-Markle and her husband, who has crewed her since her second race, head to her condo 30 minutes north of Austin in the hills. There he will hop on a bike as she runs the hills for two to four hours. “The closer I get to Badwater, the more mileage I’ll add on, so sometimes, I do two-a-day trains, I might go out for two and a half hours in the morning and an hour and a half at night.” To prep for the 13-mile hike at the end of Badwater, she’ll put on a 10-pound weighted vest and hike her running route. “I think you can walk it faster than you can run it, because it’s an 8% to 10% grade,” she said of the final push.And on the recovery side of her preparation, Chapman-Markle is just as thorough: She sits in the sauna built into her house every night for 30 to 40 minutes to help her heat train before heading to bed for seven to eight hours.*****Consistency is key to ultrarunning and completing Badwater 135, Shawn Bearden said.“Consistency is several fold,” he notes, pointing to consistency in one’s day-to-day training and being consistent in one’s training over years, and keeping one’s diet – whether high-carb, high-fat, or otherwise – consistent. “It takes years for people to build up really to being able to comfortably handle these very long distances.”This is also one reason runners in Badwater are, on average, older. The average age for Badwater 135 participants is 47 years old, with the oldest at 72. There are a few other reasons Bearden points to: as we age, we develop more of slow-twitch muscles that help on long runs. Psychological maturity comes with age. “Older people have a better understanding that the sun will come up tomorrow,” Bearden said. And it takes years for people to develop what he calls “craft”: the skills of ultrarunning and understanding the limits and needs of one’s body.For 51-year-old Filipino Tess Bibal Leono, the biggest challenge to her training is the stray dogs. An analyst for the Asian Development Bank in the Philippines, Leono’s work brings her to islands throughout the Pacific, where many hotels don’t have gyms and she will have to run on the road. Packs of stray dogs will begin to follow her and chase her if she continues running. “If I see a dog, I try to stop running. So it kind of limits your training,” she said.Leono ran the Badwater 135 in 2016 and 2018, quitting in 2018 after 80 miles due to acid reflux. Too excited for the race, she hadn’t slept the night before, and with record heat and unusual humidity, the event had the lowest completion rate in its 41-year history, with many of those disqualified by the time limit or quitting the race having finished the race in previous years. Share on Pinterest Pinterest “Risk of very, very serious medical issues in a race like Badwater is high,” Shawn Bearden, a professor of physiology at Idaho State University and ultrarunner himself, said. “We’re not built to go 50 miles, 100 miles, or Badwater 135 miles.“But we are capable of it.”The biggest challenge running Badwater is the heat. Bearden, who has crewed and paced for the Badwater race once and studied the physiology of ultrarunning, notes that the reason competitors are able to complete it is the human ability to thermoregulate and cool down by sweating. But Badwater puts a massive strain on one’s thermoregulation and therefore on one’s gastrointestinal system. “The only way you’re going to survive Badwater is by consuming enough fluids and getting fluids and nutrients back in,” Bearden explained. “That means we’ve got to be able to sweat a lot and send blood to our skin to cool off, while sending blood to our muscles to keep us moving, while sending blood to our gut to absorb water and nutrients. So there’s a massive strain on all of those tissues and systems.”And if a runner attempted to just drink water and not eat?“You have a good chance of dying by the end from a condition called hyponatremia,” Bearden said, “where you effectively dilute the salts in your blood because you’re losing some of your sweat and you’re only replacing water.” That’s not to mention the muscle breakdown, which Bearden describes on a molecular level looking “like a blender went through it,” and takes months to repair, even if a runner feels good enough to run a week later.*****Matt Collins had just left the 100-kilometer mark at Forest Park in Queens and his pacer, a cross country buddy from college, along with it. His feet padded the ground in the fresh shoes that he had changed into at the stop, where he had taped the blisters on the outside of his big and pinkie toes, and for a moment, his calloused and reddened feet were dry. He attempted to get down some pizza as he walked and readied himself for running another marathon and a half.With each stride, his hamstrings and quads screamed. His legs had been cramping for miles, and he knew the pain wouldn’t go away. It’s not going to get any worse, he told himself.Collins had been looking to the 100-kilometer marker since the beginning of the Great New York 100-miler, as he cut through Central Park heading North, ran along the Hudson and through the Bronx, and crossed the bridge into Queens with his pacer, where they laughed at Collins’ poor form reflected in store windows – his heel strike too hard, hitting the pavement like a heavy man. They sang country songs as they ran along the water in Queens and passed picnics and soccer games. When they reached the Unisphere fountains at Flushing Meadows Corona Park, the two jumped in and let the water fall down on them. Pinterest Twitter “I didn’t prepare,” Leono said. “I thought I prepared well.” Her training for the 2018 Badwater had been disrupted at times by her busy travel schedule. This year, she made a commitment to get in at least 30 minutes a day if traveling, and she will often get back to the hotel after work and nap, waking at 9pm or 12am to get a run in the hotel’s gym even if it’s just five kilometers. She has been running marathons on the weekends and tack on an extra 10 kilometers as the rest of the marathoners head home.The final hurdle for competitors is the psychological aspect. “I really think that most people who are capable of running a full marathon really could step up and run 100 miles,” Bearden said. “It’s all about your mindset and how you can handle every cell your body screaming and telling you, this is stupid. You should stop.”“That’s part of being an ultrarunner, you always get extremely depressed because you’re sleep-deprived, and fluids and sodium aren’t proper, and your brain will want you to stop, to quit, or [ask] why are you doing this? I know why I’m doing this,” Chapman-Markle said. “The one thing I do have is mental strength. And I think that’s probably 65% of running a race like this.” Chapman-Markle tries to stay positive and think nothing but grateful thoughts. “If bad thoughts do come in, I think my body needs something so I just try to figure out what it needs, give it to it, and get back to my happy thoughts,” she said.“It’s obviously very physically hard. Mentally it is probably harder,” Collins said. He recalled his first ultramarathon, a 50-miler he participated in to raise money for Roswell Park Cancer Institute, where his brother was battling leukemia. “For me, I had a reason to be out there so that eliminated a lot of the temptation of dropping out and seeing there’s an escape valve. For me, there was just the finish line,” he said.*****For Collins, the 100-mile Great New York Running Exposition didn’t prompt the usual roller coaster of emotion he normally experiences during an ultramarathon. Collins finished first, crossing the finish line at 16hr 11min, jubilant to sit down and cheer on his friend who had closed in on his lead and finished first for the women.“I felt really excited for what we’re going to do in three weeks [at Badwater],” he said. “It was exactly the test I wanted it to be.”Collins was clear that the race was an exception. “It was the first one ever I haven’t cried,” he said. He had run the Great New York 100-miler before, the terrain was relatively flat, and the weather, at 80F, mild. Badwater would be another beast.But Collins has learned a lot since his first ultramarathon at 24 and about what his body can handle. He tried to drive home by himself from that first 50-miler and, in sheer exhaustion, put the car into an embankment. This time, he booked himself a hotel in Times Square where the race ended, so he wouldn’t have to walk too far.“You just go to such insane lows, and that bring you to such amazing highs,” Collins said. “I’m not usually good at race specific training, which this race is a bit of an aberration from that.”Before heading off to the desert this weekend, Collins flew to Puerto Rico for the Fourth of July weekend, taking the week before Badwater off from any strenuous runs. When asked what he’d do with his week off, he said with a smile: “Probably nothing productive.” Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

SENIOR TEAM TRAVEL INFORMATION

first_imgATTENTION ALL SENIOR PLAYERS FOR THE 2005 ALL NATIONS TOURNAMENT: Australian Senior Team members travelling to New Zealand to participate in the 2005 All Nations Championships are invited to make their travel with the ATA travel provider International Sports Tours Pty Ltd. (IST) This offer is also being made to any Australian spectators or family members who would like to have any aspect of their travel organised for them. If you would like IST to book your flights for you, accommodation for spectators or to organise extended travel before or after the All Nations tournament, please use the following links to find all the info and the booking forms that you can send back to IST to help you with your travel arrangements. Link to Informatiom Memo MEMO Link to Itinerary planner ITINERARY PLANNER Link to Booking Form BOOKING FORM For more info feel free to contact International Sports Tours on (02) 9922 6166last_img read more

2012 NSWTA State Cup

first_imgThe 2012 New South Wales Touch Association (NSWTA) State Cup will be held this weekend from Friday, 7 December to Sunday, 9 December at the Port Macquarie Regional Sporting Complex.  208 teams will compete in the event across 13 divisions, ranging from Under 20’s through to the Men’s 50’s division. Approximately 3,000 players will take part in the event, as well as approximately 170 referees, coming together to participate in one of the largest Touch Football events in the world.  This year’s State Cup will  see invitational teams from Japan compete in the Men’s and Women’s Open divisions, while the event is also a great opportunity for New South Wales’ Australian representatives to participate in the lead up to the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series against New Zealand in Auckland in February next year.  Round games will commence on Friday morning, running through the weekend with the finals concluding the tournament on Sunday afternoon. The first Grand Finals will begin at 12.40pm, with the Mixed Open final at 2.25pm, Women’s Open at 3.05pm and the Men’s Open at 3.50pm.In the Men’s Open division, the Eastern Suburbs Roosters will be looking to make it back-to-back State Cup titles, whilst the Penrith Panthers will be looking to seal the Vawdon Cup/State Cup double after their Vawdon Cup title win four weeks ago.The Canterbury Bulldogs will be hopeful of taking out their seventh consecutive State Cup Women’s Open title this year and will face tough opposition from the 2012 Vawdon Cup champions, the Eastern Suburbs Roosters, while the Wollongong Devils have been runners-up at State Cup for the past two years and will be hoping it is third time lucky in 2012.In the Mixed Open division, it will be a tight one again after a strongly contested Vawdon Cup series. The Eastern Suburbs Roosters will be a strong force in the State Cup after taking out the 2012 Vawdon Cup title. Last year’s State Cup champions, the Murwillumbah Mavericks will return in 2012 and will be keen to make it back-to-back titles, while the Wests Magpies, who were runners-up to the Roosters in the Vawdon Cup, will also be a team to watch out for.  You can keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information from the 2012 New South Wales State Cup in the following ways:Websites:www.nswtaevents.sportingpulse.netwww.nswtouch.com.auFacebook:www.facebook.com/nswtouchTwitter: www.twitter.com/nsw_touch (Don’t forget to use the #statecup2012 hashtag)YouTube:www.youtube.com/nswtaInstagram:Search for ‘Touch Football Australia’Related Links2012 NSW State Cuplast_img read more

10 months agoRondon insists Liverpool capable of upsetting Liverpool

first_imgRondon insists Liverpool capable of upsetting Liverpoolby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle striker Salomon Rondon insists they’re capable of upsetting Liverpool.Rondon refuses to be daunted by the Premier League table toppers and feels United’s squad should look at their own qualities rather than worry about the likes of Mo Salah, Roberto Firmino and Sadio Mané.As Newcastle bid for their first win at Anfield since 1994, Rondon told the Chronicle: “Salah, Firminio and Mane are great players but every game is difficult.”Liverpool are playing really well, Salah and Firminio have a lot of goals, but we must think of our players and what we can do.”We will respect our opponents but we know we can get a result.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoRoma boss Fonseca delighted with thumping win against Istanbul Basaksehir

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Roma boss Fonseca delighted with thumping win against Istanbul Basaksehirby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveRoma boss Paulo Fonseca was delighted with their 4-0 win against Europa League opponents Istanbul Basaksehir.Nicolò Zaniolo created one for Edin Dzeko and scored another himself for the rout.Fonseca said, “The game with Lazio was very important for us, as it helped us understand what we were doing wrong and we did a lot wrong in that match. We talked about the performance and told the players we had to be more aggressive, keep control of the ball, and the team is learning that.“I am very happy with the progress made and the way they are playing now. The passing lines are very important and we need movement to open up the channels, to provide options.“I am feeling confident, because all the players have understood what I want. They are open to my ideas. It’s important not to concede goals, but we are doing particularly well in attack at the moment.” last_img read more

23 days agoMan Utd target Longstaff, Dembele in £90M January swoop

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd target Longstaff, Dembele in £90M January swoopby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United are hoping to sign Sean Longstaff and Moussa Dembele in January.A slow start to the season has left the Red Devils in tenth on the Premier League.Manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer wants to top up his squad when the transfer window opens this winter.And the Daily Star claims Newcastle midfielder Longstaff and Lyon striker Dembele are at the top of Solskjaer’s wishlist.Transfers chief Ed Woodward is currently gathering a combined total of £90m to sign both players.United have also shown an interest in Declan Rice, but have been blown away by West Ham’s £80m valuation. last_img

Photo: Arkansas Coach Bret Bielema Is Wearing Metallic Nike Air Force 1s To SEC Media Days

first_imgArkansas Coach Bret Bielema's metallic Nike Air Force 1s.Bielema Air ForcesThe SEC West is regarded by many as the toughest division in college football. Apparently, the stiff competition extends beyond the gridiron and encompasses the footwear of the division’s head coaches.Yesterday, Mississippi State head coach Dan Mullen sported adidas Yeezy Low Boost’s at SEC Media Days. Not to be outdone, Arkansas head coach Bret Bielema is bringing the heat on his feet with some glittery Nikes. Thanks MJ and #Nike for these great pair of Air Force 1 special Bling/Bling addition for #SEC media days #WoooPig pic.twitter.com/l9UvV04gpQ— Bret Bielema (@BretBielema) July 15, 2015 Those aren’t subtle at all. Leave it to Bielema to try and leave his own big impression.last_img

Watch: Teez Tabor Celebrates Florida’s Win By Planting Flag In LSU’s End Zone

first_imgTeez Tabor plants Florida's flag in LSU's end zone.Twitter/nickdelatorreGCTo say Teez Tabor was pumped after Florida’s win over LSU would be an understatement.Florida topped LSU in Death Valley on Saturday thanks to a goal line stand, and Gators defensive back Teez Tabor celebrated in style.Nick de la Torre of Gator Country captured this video of the junior running around with an orange flag and sticking it into the ground of LSU’s end zone:Teez #Gators pic.twitter.com/CnqkvtWt4u— Nick de la Torre (@NickdelaTorreGC) November 19, 2016With its 16-10 win, Florida punched its ticket to Atlanta as the Gators are now back-t0-back SEC East champions. The Gators will take on Alabama in two weeks in the SEC Championship Game.Tabor had five solo tackles and one pass deflection against the Tigers on Saturday.last_img

Aubameyang hints he’s staying at Arsenal

first_imgPierre-Emerick Aubameyang has appeared to commit himself to Arsenal despite mounting speculation over his future at the club.The 30-year-old, who joined the Gunners from Dortmund in January 2018, scored 22 Premier League goals last season that meant he would share the Golden Boot award with Liverpool duo Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane.Arsenal did, however, miss out on qualification for the Champions League as they ended the season in fifth place in the table, while they were also beaten in the Europa League final by Chelsea. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? That had seen speculation surface regarding Aubameyang’s future, with a mega-money offer to move to China reportedly having been on the table, while Manchester United have even been linked with making a £70 million move.But speaking to the club’s official website, the Gunners striker discussed his joy at claiming the Golden Boot and how he was proud to be representing the north Londoners.He also signed off his message with the words “next season… let’s go”, suggesting that he is looking forward to getting the 2019-20 campaign underway with Unai Emery’s side.Reflecting on the 4-1 Europa League final defeat to Chelsea, he said: “Of course the season didn’t end the way we wanted it to. Losing a final like that is tough for everyone, the players, our families and the fans.Why Lacazette & Aubameyang are the last players Arsenal should sellAlexandre Lacazette Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang Arsenal“We were all gutted in the dressing room after what happened in Baku and that’s when you need the people around you.”As always, my father had travelled to Baku with the rest of my family to watch me play. ‘Just continue the way you’re going,’ he said after the match. ‘You can do it better, you can get even better.’ “I’ve listened to my father’s advice throughout my whole career so if he tells me that I can get even better, then that’s exactly what I’m going to do.”Next season… let’s go!”On his Golden Boot win, he added: “It meant a lot to win the Golden Boot. I am really happy and proud of it, especially to share the trophy with Sadio Mane and Mohamed Salah. I really like these two guys. We are representing Africa so it is a good sign for the continent.”Africa is in my heart and in my mind, so I’m extremely proud to represent it in the Premier League. The African people really love football, like everyone across the world, it makes me very proud to represent Africa in such an amazing way because not everyone gets the chance to play in the Arsenal colours.”last_img read more

Michigan Announces Injury Update For Star WR Tarik Black

first_imgView of a Michigan Wolverines football helmet before their game against the Utah Utes.SALT LAKE CITY, UT – SEPTEMBER 3: View of a Michigan Wolverines football helmet before their game against the Utah Utes at Rice-Eccles Stadium on September 3, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by Gene Sweeney Jr/Getty Images)Michigan’s football program announced this afternoon an injury update for sophomore wide receiver Tarik Black, who was rumored to have been hurt at practice this weekend.Black, a former four-star recruit, was thought to be a breakout candidate on offense for the Wolverines this fall. He had a promising start to his freshman season, catching 11 passes for 149 yards and 1 touchdown before missing the rest of the year.Michigan issued the following update for him this afternoon. It doesn’t sound good.“The Michigan Football program announced that wide receiver Tarik Black sustained a right foot injury at Saturday’s practice.Tarik is currently being evaluated and no definitive time frame has been determined for his return to play.”From UM: The Michigan Football program announced that wide receiver Tarik Black sustained a right foot injury at Saturday’s practice. Tarik is currently being evaluated and no definitive time frame has been determined for his return to play.— angelique (@chengelis) August 26, 2018Black was ranked one of the top wide receivers in the country coming out of high school in 2017. He played extremely well as a true freshman before getting hurt last fall.Michigan missed him greatly when he was injured in 2017.“I think our receivers did a good job last year, I wouldn’t say I was the (only good player), you know what I mean? But I do think I can bring something to the table as a deep threat guy,” he said. “That’s not all I am, though. I can run routes and things like that, too,” he said this month.Michigan has a new QB in Shea Patterson and Black was expected to be one of his top targets on offense.The Wolverines are set to open the year on Sept. 1 against Notre Dame. Stay tuned for more updates on Black.last_img read more

ESPN Releases 2nd Half Prediction For Ohio State-Penn State Game

first_imgView of the Beaver stadium.STATE COLLEGE, PA – NOVEMBER 21: A general view of the stadium prior to the game between the Michigan Wolverines and Penn State Nittany Lions at Beaver Stadium on November 21, 2015 in State College, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Evan Habeeb/Getty Images)Ohio State is in a battle with Penn State in Happy Valley as both teams look to stay undefeated on the season. The past two winners of this game have gone on to win the Big Ten, though both teams were spurned by the College Football Playoff committee.Tonight, it was all Penn State early as the Nittany Lions’ defense stifled Dwayne Haskins and the Buckeyes offense. Penn State heavily out-gained Ohio State on offense, but the Buckeyes defense played bend-but-don’t-break football in the first half.Ohio State used a late turnover to put seven points on the board and finally enter the game. After 30 minutes of play Penn State leads 13-7.Can the team hold on? ESPN’s FPI gave its prediction for the second half.ESPN score prediction for Ohio State and Penn State.The final 30 minutes of play will go a long way to determining the potential Big Ten champ. Both teams are capable of playing at the highest level, but who will win out?Stay tuned.last_img read more

ESPN’s Kirk Herbstreit Predicts Winner Of Florida-Georgia

first_imgEvander Holyfield on College GameDay.From making a statement to inching closer to the College Football Playoff, today’s showdown between Florida and Georgia will have a huge impact on the upcoming rankings. ESPN’s College GameDay was in Jacksonville for the game, as Kirk Herbstreit and the rest of the crew made their picks.The Gators were certainly getting love from Lee Corso, but everyone else on the panel couldn’t pick against the Bulldogs.Although the two programs are trending in different directions, Herbstreit believes Georgia will improve to 7-1 on the season.College Gameday Picks:Desmond: GeorgiaEvander Holyfield: GeorgiaCorso: FloridaHerbstreit: Georgia#CollegeGameday— CFB Home (@CFBHome) October 27, 2018Jake Fromm and the rest of the offense has been sputtering lately, but defeating Florida would certainly help them get back on track.However, the Gators won’t be an easy opponent by any means. After all, they defeated LSU in convincing fashion earlier this season.This game will be on CBS, as kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m. ET from TIAA Bank Field.Who do you think will win this SEC showdown?last_img read more

Jim Harbaugh Has Great Answer To College Football Playoff Question

first_imgHead coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines reacts to a roughing the kicker call against his team during the first quarter against the Ohio State Buckeyes.ANN ARBOR, MI – NOVEMBER 28: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines reacts to a roughing the kicker call against his team during the first quarter against the Ohio State Buckeyes at Michigan Stadium on November 28, 2015 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Michigan is in the driver’s seat in the Big Ten and a spot in the College Football Playoff. But with plenty of teams nipping at their heels, Jim Harbaugh’s team is no lock to make the College Football Playoff.Ahead of their game against Big Ten minnow Rutgers, Harbaugh was asked what he thought about Michigan’s playoff chances.But Harbaugh insisted that Michigan is focused solely on their next game, and are not looking ahead.“It doesn’t seem like a very good idea to look ahead. Take it one game at a time,” Harbaugh said on Monday.Jim Harbaugh on College Football Playoff talk: “It doesn’t seem like a very good idea to look ahead. Take it one game at a time.”— Kyle Rowland (@KyleRowland) November 5, 2018Despite their success under Harbaugh, Michigan has been waiting a long time for a return to the top of college football.The Wolverines have finished in the Top-10 only five times in the last 20 years. Their last National Championship came in 1997, when they won the Rose Bowl under head coach Lloyd Carr and QB Brian Griese.The key game for Michigan will be the final week of the season against Ohio State. Assuming both teams win out before then, the game will decide which team gets a spot in the Big Ten title game.last_img read more

ESPN’s Final Prediction For Today’s Ohio State-Michigan Game

first_imgHead coach Urban Meyer of the Ohio State Buckeyes and Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines talk on the field prior to their game.COLUMBUS, OH – NOVEMBER 26: (R-L) Head coach Urban Meyer of the Ohio State Buckeyes and Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines talk on the field prior to their game at Ohio Stadium on November 26, 2016 in Columbus, Ohio. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Ohio State and Michigan are now less than four hours from kicking off at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. The Buckeyes and the Wolverines are set to play what should be an epic rivalry game.Urban Meyer and Jim Harbaugh’s teams both enter today’s contest at 10-1. The Buckeyes and the Wolverines are playing for a spot in the Big Ten Championship Game (and, maybe, a berth into the College Football Playoff).Ohio State has dominated the rivalry as of late, as Urban Meyer has yet to lose to Michigan as the Buckeyes’ head coach (Jim Harbaugh, meanwhile, has yet to beat Ohio State as the Wolverines’ head coach).Michigan is the favorite today, though. The Wolverines are a road favorite at Ohio State for the first time since 2004.Who’s going to emerge with the win?ESPN’s computer has made its prediction.ESPN’s Football Power Index is giving No. 4 Michigan a 54.6 percent chance to win this game, giving No. 10 Ohio State a 45.4 percent chance of pulling off the upset.Michigan is coming into today’s game against Ohio State as a 5-point favorite. The Wolverines opened the week as a 3.5-point favorite, but the betting spread has grown in their favor.Ohio State and Michigan are set to kick off at noon E.T. The game will be on FOX.last_img read more

Jim Harbaugh Wants Michigan Hoops Star To Try Football

first_imgJim Harbaugh speaks as he is introduced as the new Head Coach of the University of Michigan football team.ANN ARBOR, MI – DECEMBER 30: Jim Harbaugh speaks as he is introduced as the new Head Coach of the University of Michigan football team at the Junge Family Champions Center on December 30, 2014 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh has been looking high and low for recruits this year. But he may be looking at a potential prospect that’s already living on his campus.In a recent episode of his “Attack Each Day” podcast, Harbaugh has expressed interested in a member of John Beilein’s basketball team: power forward Isaiah Livers. Harbaugh went so far as to say that Livers could very well be a tight end on his team immediately.Per WolverinesWire, Harbaugh was discussing incoming defensive tackle Chris Hinton, whose father was a guest on the show. Hinton also loves basketball, which set the discussion in that direction.“You mention basketball players that like to play football, I like basketball a lot, too,” Harbaugh said. “I’ll just put this out there: if Isaiah Livers is a basketball player that likes to watch football, at some point, I’d love to get him an opportunity to play football! Isaiah Livers, the sixth-man on our basketball team here at Michigan right now – tight end would be a heckuva position (for him).”Livers is listed at 6-foot-8 and over 200 pounds, and was a four-star prospect coming out of high school in 2017. But in two years he has averaged under 18 minutes per game and only five points per game.He has seen better numbers this past season though. Livers is currently averaging over 21 minutes per game and 7.3 points per game. But he has yet to make a start.There have been few athletes who have made the transition from basketball to football, and even fewer who have done so at a level.But there are plenty of success stories of players who were able to play both sports well.Tony Gonzalez, Donovan McNabb, Jimmy Graham, Antonio Gates, and Terrell Owens are all famous for having transitioned from one to another or both.[Attack Each Day via WolverinesWire]last_img read more